shortcut to content

Minnesota State University, Mankato

Minnesota State University, Mankato
Admissions

Minnesota Transfer Curriculum

Page address: http://www.mnsu.edu/admissions/transfer/transfer/mntransfercurriculum.html
Transferology

 

Completion of the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum fulfills the general education requirement for any degree at Minnesota State University, Mankato.

Completion of any of the goal areas within the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum will be accepted as completion of that same goal area at Minnesota State Mankato. Individual competencies will be evaluated and transferred on a course-by-course basis.

Students transferring from Minnesota State Mankato to another Minnesota public institution of higher education will have fulfilled the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum if they have completed 40 credits of required courses in the following ten goal areas: Communication, Critical Thinking, Natural Science, Mathematical/ Logical Reasoning, History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences, Humanities and the Arts, Human Diversity, Global Perspective, Ethical and Civic Responsibility, and People and the Environment.

Goal areas 1C, 11, 12, and 13 are part of the general education curriculum at Minnesota State Mankato but are not goal areas in the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum.

Students may also use Transferology to determine transferability of coursework. Minnesota Transfer has additional tools and resources to assist transfer students.

Passing grades (A-D) for MnTC courses apply including transfer courses. A cumulative MnTC GPA of 2.0 is required to complete the entire 40 credit package.

GOAL AREA 1: COMMUNICATION

Goal: To develop writers and speakers who use the English language effectively and who read, write, speak, and listen critically. At a base, all students should complete introductory communication requirements early in their college studies. Writing competency is an ongoing process to be reinforced through writing intensive courses and writing across the curriculum. Speaking and listening skills need reinforcement. There are multiple opportunities for interpersonal communication, public speaking and discussion.

Part A: English Composition

Requires one course, 3 credits or more, with a grade of at least “P” or “C” (2.0). A grade of “C-” does not satisfy this goal area.

Goal: The goal is to provide students with

  • a rich understanding of how writing works
  • guided opportunities to apply this understanding in specific writing situations
  • experience analyzing, researching, and writing for academic writing situations
  • opportunities to reflect on the development of their writing knowledge and skills

Students will be able to:

(a) draw upon strategies for idea generation, drafting, revision, design, and editing;
(b) analyze and produce texts guided by basic rhetorical concepts;
(c) practice critical reading skills, including the ability to identify genre conventions and evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning in a text;
(d) demonstrate effective research processes, including the ability to gather academic and non-academic sources and assess their quality and suitability for the writing situation;
(e) integrate sources in their writing to achieve specific aims, making appropriate use of summary, paraphrase, quotation, and citation conventions;
(f) explain their writing choices, using concrete examples to support their claims;
(g) employ syntax and usage appropriate to academic disciplines and the professional world.

ENG 101 Composition 4
ENG 101P Composition 4
ENG 104 Stretch Composition II 4

Part B: Speech and Oral Reasoning

(Requires one course, 3 credits or more)

Goal: To develop skills necessary for reasoned communication. Courses in this goal area will require individual public speaking which is critiqued by the instructor. Speaking and reasoning competency is an ongoing process which needs to be reinforced throughout the curriculum.

Students will be able to:

(a) understand/demonstrate communication processes through invention, organization, drafting, revision, editing and presentation;
(b) participate effectively in groups with emphasis on listening, critical and reflective thinking, and responding;
(c) analyze, evaluate, and synthesize in a responsible manner material from diverse sources and points of view.
(d) select appropriate communication choices for specific audiences;
(e) construct logical and coherent arguments;
(f) use authority, point of view, and individual voice and style in communications;
(g) employ syntax, usage and analytical techniques appropriate to academic disciplines and the professional world.

CDIS 201 Observation of Human Communication 3
CMST 100 Fundamentals of Communication 3
CMST 102 Public Speaking 3
CMST 212 Professional Communication and Interviewing 4
POL 234 Model United Nations 3

GOAL AREA 2: CRITICAL THINKING

(Requires completion of the rest of the General Education Program or one course)

Goal: To develop critical thinking, communication, and problem solving skills. Courses in this goal area must focus on skill development and throughout the course will provide opportunities to exercise skills although the exercise of skills requires a subject matter, the emphasis in this goal area will be on skill development. The skills will not be ones that are specific to the practice of a particular discipline or area of inquiry but rather will be skills that are common to different disciplines and different areas of inquiry.

Students will be able to:

(a) gather and analyze information of various kinds, employing formal or informal tools to represent information in ways useful for solving problems;
(b) weigh evidence for and against hypotheses;
(c) recognize, construct, and evaluate arguments;
(d) apply appropriate critical and evaluative principles to texts, documents, or works—one’s own or others’—in oral, visual, or written mediums.

AST 115 Life in the Universe 2
CHEM 111 Chemistry of Life Processes Part II (Organic & Biochemistry) 5
CHEM 191 Chemistry Applications 3
CHEM 201 General Chemistry I 5
CMST 101W Interpersonal Communication 4
CSP 110 Decision Making for Career and Life 3
ECON 103W The Economics of Women's Issues and Public Policy in the United States 3
ECON 207 Business Statistics 4
ENG 201W Intermediate Writing 4
ENG 271W Technical Communication 4
ENG 272W Business Communication 4
ENG 301W Advanced Writing 4
GERO 200 Family Dynamics of Aging 3
GERO 200W Family Dynamics of Aging 4
GWS 230 Gender, Race, and Popular Culture 4
HLTH 212 Consumer Health 3
KSP 200 Critical Issues in Public Education 3
MATH 290 Foundations of Mathematics 4
MUS 321W Music Literature and History I 3
MUS 322W Music Literature and History II 3
PHIL 110 Logic and Critical Thinking 3
PHIL 112 Logic of Scientific Method 3
PHIL 311 Symbolic Logic 3
PHYS 211 Principles of Physics I 4
PHYS 221 General Physics I 4
POL 103W Thinking About Politics 3
PSYC 103W Psychology Today 3

GOAL AREA 3: NATURAL SCIENCE

(Requires two courses from different disciplines, 6 credits or more. At least one course must have a laboratory)

Goal: To improve students’ understanding of natural science principles and of the methods of scientific inquiry, i.e., the ways in which scientists investigate natural science phenomena. Students should be encouraged to study both the biological and physical sciences.

Students will be able to:

(a) develop understanding of scientific theories;
(b) formulate and test hypotheses in either laboratory, simulation, or field experiences;
(c) communicate his/her experimental findings and interpretations both orally and in writing;
(d) apply the natural science perspective to society issues.

ANTH 120 Forensic Science: An Anthropological Approach 3
ANTH 210 Introduction to Archaeology 4
ANTH 220 Human Origins 4
AST 101 Introduction to Astronomy 3
AST 102 Introduction to the Planets 3
AST 104 Introduction to Experimental Astronomy 2
AST 115 Life in the Universe 2
BIOL 100 Our Natural World 4
BIOL 102 Biology of Women 3
BIOL 103W Introduction to Biotechnology 3
BIOL 105 General Biology I 4
BIOL 105W General Biology I 4
BIOL 270 Microbiology 4
CHEM 100 Chemistry in Society 4
CHEM 104 Introduction to Chemistry 3
CHEM 106 Chemistry of Life Processes Part I (General) 3
CHEM 111 Chemistry of Life Processes Part II (Organic & Biochemistry) 5
CHEM 131 Forensic Science 3
CHEM 134 Mind Altering Substances 3
CHEM 135 Science of Sport 3
CHEM 191 Chemistry Applications 3
CHEM 201 General Chemistry I 5
EET 112 Elementary Electricity and Electronics 3
EET 118 Electricity - Generation, Usage & Green Alternatives 3
FCS 140 Introduction to Nutrition 3
GEOG 101 Introductory Physical Geography 3
GEOL 100 Our Geologic Environment  
GEOL 108 Oceans of the World 3
GEOL 121 Physical Geology 4
GEOL 122 Earth History 4
PHYS 100 Cultural Physics 3
PHYS 101 Introductory Physics 3
PHYS 102 Physics in the World Around Us 3
PHYS 105 Time, Atomic Clocks, and Relativity 3
PHYS 107 Physics of Flight 3
PHYS 110 Physics and Our Audio Environment 3
PHYS 211 Principles of Physics I 4
PHYS 221 General Physics I 4

GOAL AREA 4: MATHEMATICAL /LOGICAL REASONING

Requires one course, 3 credits or more, with a grade of at least “P” or “C”, i.e. 2.0. A grade of “C-” does not satisfy this goal area.

Goal: To increase students’ knowledge about mathematical and logical modes of thinking. This will enable students to appreciate the breadth of applications of mathematics, evaluate arguments, and detect fallacious reasoning. Students will learn to apply mathematics, logic, and/or statistics to help them make decisions in their lives and careers. Students will be able to:
(a) illustrate historical and contemporary applications of mathematical/logical systems;
(b) clearly express mathematical/logical ideas in writing;
(c) explain what constitutes a valid mathematical/logical argument (proof);
(d) apply higher-order problem-solving and/or modeling strategies.

ECON 207 Business Statistics 4
MATH 110 Perspectives in Mathematics 3
MATH 112 College Algebra 4
MATH 113 Trigonometry 3
MATH 115 Precalculus Mathematics 4
MATH 121 Calculus I 4
MATH 130 Finite Mathematics and Introductory Calculus 4
MATH 180 Mathematics for Computer Science 4
MATH 181 Intuitive Calculus 3
MATH 201 Elements of Mathematics I 3
PHIL 110 Logic and Critical Thinking 3
PHIL 112 Logic of Scientific Method 3
PHIL 311 Symbolic Logic 3
SOC 202 Introductory Social Statistics 3
STAT 154 Elementary Statistics 3

GOAL AREA 5: HISTORY AND THE SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

(Requires two courses from different disciplines, 6 credits or more)

Goal: To increase students’ knowledge of how historians and social and behavioral scientists discover, describe, and explain the behaviors and interactions among individuals, groups, institutions, events and ideas and to challenge students to examine the implications of this knowledge and its interconnection with action and living an informed life. Students will be able to:
(a) employ the methods and data that historians and social and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human condition;
(b) examine social institutions and processes across a range of historical periods and cultures;
(c) use and critique alternative explanatory systems or theories;
(d) develop and communicate alternative explanations or solutions for contemporary social issues.

AIS 101 Introduction to American Indian Studies 3
AIS 102 The Story of American Indian Country to 1900 4
AIS 210 Oral Traditions 3
AIS 210W Oral Traditions 3
AIS 220W Tribal Sovereignty 3
AIS 230W American Indians of Minnesota 3
AIS 240 American Indian Women 3
AIS 240W American Indian Women 3
ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthropology 4
ANTH 102 Ancient Peoples 4
ANTH 240 Language and Culture 4
ANTH 250W Portraits of Culture 4
ANTH 260 Vampires, Werewolves, and Zombies: Folklore of Fear 3
ANTH 261 Taboos, Tattoos, and T-Shirts: Culture and Body Art 3
CORR 106 Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems 3
CORR 255 Juvenile Delinquency 3
ECON 100 An Introduction to the U.S. Economy 3
ECON 103W The Economics of Women's Issues and Public Policy in the United States 3
ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
ECON 202 Principles of Microeconomics 3
ECON 314W Current Economic Issues 3
ETHN 100 American Racial Minorities 3
ETHN 101 Introduction to Multicultural & Ethnic Studies 3
ETHN 201W Perspectives on African Americans 3
ETHN 202W Perspectives on American Indians in Ethnic Studies 3
ETHN 203W Perspectives on Asian Americans 3
ETHN 204W Perspectives on Latinos/Hispanics 3
ETHN 220W Civil Rights in the U.S. 3
ETHN 440 Asian American Studies 3
FCS 100 Personal & Family Living 3
GEOG 103 Introductory Cultural Geography 3
GWS 110 Introduction to Gender 4
GWS 110W Introduction to Gender 4
GWS 225 Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies 4
GWS 225W Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies 4
HIST 155 History of the Family in America 3
HIST 160 Introduction to Traditional East Asian Civilization 4
HIST 170 Ancient World Civilization to 1500 4
HIST 170W Ancient World Civilization to 1500 4
HIST 171 World Civilization, 1500-Present 4
HIST 171W World Civilization, 1500-Present 4
HIST 180 European History to 1648 4
HIST 180W European History to 1648 4
HIST 181 European History: 1648 to the Present 4
HIST 181W European History: 1648 to the Present 4
HIST 190 United States to 1877 4
HIST 190W United States to 1877 4
HIST 191 United States Since 1877 4
HIST 191W United States Since 1877 4
HLTH 240 Drug Education 3
KSP 235 Human Development 3
LAWE 132 Crime and Punishment 3
MRKT 100 Global Business Concepts 3
MSL 252 The Evolution of American Warfare 3
MUSE 200W Introduction to Museum Studies 3
POL 100 Introduction to Politics 3
POL 104 Understanding the U.S. Constitution 3
POL 111 United States Government 3
PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychological Science 4
PSYC 206 The Human Mind 4
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3
SOC 101W Introduction to Sociology 3
SOC 150 Social Problems 3
SOC 208 Courtship, Marriage & Family 3
SOC 209 Sociology of Human Sexualities 3
SOC 255 Juvenile Delinquency 3
SOWK 180W Social Welfare Services 3
SOWK 255 Global Responses to Human Need 3
URBS 100 Introduction to the City 3
URBS 150 Sustainable Communities 3

GOAL AREA 6: HUMANITIES AND THE ARTS

(Requires two courses from different disciplines, 6 credits or more)

Goal: To expand students’ knowledge of the human condition and human cultures, especially in relation to behavior, ideas, and values expressed in works of human imagination and thought. Through study in disciplines such as literature, philosophy, and the fi ne arts, students will engage in critical analysis, form aesthetic judgments, and develop an appreciation of the arts and humanities as fundamental to the health and survival of any society. Students should have experiences in both the arts and humanities.

Students will be able to:

(a) demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities;
(b) understand those works as expressions of individual and human values within an historical and social context;
(c) respond critically to works in the arts and humanities;
(d) engage in the creative process or interpretive performance;
(e) articulate an informed personal reaction to works in the arts and humanities.

ART 100 Elements and Principles of Art 3
ART 160 Introduction to Visual Culture 3
ART 231 Mixed Media 3
ART 260 Art History Survey I 3
ART 261 Art History Survey II 3
ART 265W Art As Politics 3
ART 275 Photography 3
CMST 310 Performance of Literature 4
CS 201W Artificial Intelligence & Science Fiction 4
DANC 120 Introduction to Dance 3
DANC 120W Introduction to Dance 3
EET 125 Perspective on Technology 3
ENG 110 Introduction to Literature 4
ENG 110P Introduction to Literature 4
ENG 112W Introduction to Poetry and Drama 4
ENG 113W Introduction to Prose Literature 4
ENG 118 Diverse Cultures in Literature and Film 4
ENG 125 International Children's Literature 4
ENG 146 Introduction to Shakespeare 4
ENG 211W Perspectives in Literature and Human Diversity 4
ENG 212W Perspectives in World Literature 4
ENG 213W Perspectives: Ethics and Civic Responsibility in Literature 4
ENG 215 Topics in Literature  
FILM 110 Film Appreciation 4
FILM 114 Introduction to Film 4
FILM 210W Film Genres 4
FILM 214 Topics in Film  
FILM 216W Writing About Film 4
FILM 217 Introduction to Film Production 4
FILM 334W International Cinema 4
GER 150W The German-Speaking Countries: An Interdisciplinary Introduction 4
GWS 230 Gender, Race, and Popular Culture 4
GWS 251 Coming of Age: Gender and Culture 4
GWS 251W Coming of Age: Gender and Culture 4
HUM 101W Introduction to Humanities and the Search for Meaning 4
HUM 150 Western Humanities I: Beginnings through the Renaissance 4
HUM 151 Western Humanities II: Renaissance through the Present 4
HUM 155 Global Humanities I 4
HUM 156 Global Humanities II 4
HUM 250 Perspectives in Humanities  
HUM 250W Perspectives in Humanities 4
HUM 280 Humanities Traditions  
HUM 280W Humanities Traditions 4
HUM 281W Human Diversity and Humanities Traditions 4
HUM 282W Global Perspectives and Humanities Traditions 4
KSP 251 Coming of Age: Gender and Culture 3
MASS 260 Principles of Visual Mass Media 4
MUS 120 Introduction to Music 3
MUS 125 Pop Music USA: Jazz to Country to Blues 3
MUS 126 Pop Music USA: R & B to MTV 3
MUS 127 Music Money and Success 3
MUS 328 Music of the World 3
PHIL 100W Introduction to Philosophy 3
PHIL 101W Philosophical Problem: The Mind-Body Problem 3
PHIL 115W Philosophy of Race, Class and Gender 3
PHIL 120W Introduction to Ethics 3
PHIL 205W Culture, Identity, and Diversity 3
PHIL 222W Medical Ethics 3
PHIL 224W Business Ethics 3
PHIL 240W Law, Justice & Society 3
PHIL 321W Social & Political Philosophy 3
PHIL 322W Ethical Theory 3
PHIL 323W Philosophy of Economics 3
PHIL 334W History of Philosophy: Classical Philosophy 3
PHIL 336W History of Philosophy: Renaissance and Modern Philosophy 3
PHIL 337 19th Century Philosophy 3
PHIL 358W Eastern Philosophy 3
SCAN 150W The Nordic Countries: Interdisciplinary Introduction 4
SCAN 251W Scandinavian Cultures: The Sami 4
THEA 100 Introduction to Theatre 3
THEA 101 Acting for Everyone 3
THEA 115 Experiencing Theatre 3
THEA 285W Theatre of Diversity 3
URBS 110 The City: Design and Architecture 3

GOAL AREA 7: HUMAN DIVERSITY

(Requires one course, 3 credits or more)

Goal: To increase students’ understanding of individual and group differences, emphasizing the dynamics of race, gender, sexual orientation, age, class, and/or disabilities in the history and culture of diverse groups in the United States; the contributions of pluralism to United States society and culture; and issues--economic, political, social, cultural, artistic, humanistic, and education traditions- -that surround such diversity. Stu dents should be able to evaluate the United States’ historical and contemporary responses to group differences.

Students will be able to:

(a) understand the development of and the changing meanings of group identities in the United States’ history and cultures;
(b) demonstrate an awareness of the individual and institutional dynamics of unequal power relations between groups in contemporary society;
(c) analyze and evaluate their own attitudes, behaviors, concepts, and beliefs regarding diversity, racism, and bigotry;
(d) describe and discuss the experience and contributions (political, social, economic, artistic, humanistic, etc.) of the many groups that shape American society and culture, in particular those groups which have suffered discrimination and exclusion;
(e) demonstrate communication skills necessary for living and working effectively in a society with great population diversity.

AIS 101 Introduction to American Indian Studies 3
AIS 102 The Story of American Indian Country to 1900 4
AIS 210 Oral Traditions 3
AIS 210W Oral Traditions 3
AIS 220W Introduction to Tribal Sovereignty 3
AIS 230W American Indians of Minnesota 3
AIS 240 American Indian Women 3
AIS 240W American Indian Women 3
ANTH 280 Engaged Anthropology: Service Learning 3
CDIS 290 Introduction to Communication Disorders 3
CMST 203 Intercultural Communication 4
EEC 222W Human Relations in a Multicultural Society 3
ENG 118 Diverse Cultures in Literature and Film 4
ENG 211W Perspectives in Literature and Human Diversity 4
ETHN 100 American Racial Minorities 3
ETHN 101 Introduction to Multicultural & Ethnic Studies 3
ETHN 150 Multi-Cultural/Ethnic Experience 3
ETHN 200 Interracial/Interethnic Dating/Marriage 3
ETHN 201W Perspectives on African Americans 3
ETHN 202W Perspectives on American Indians in Ethnic Studies 3
ETHN 203W Perspectives on Asian Americans 3
ETHN 204W Perspectives on Latinos/Hispanics 3
GERO 200 Family Dynamics of Aging 3
GERO 200W Family Dynamics of Aging 4
GWS 110 Introduction to Gender 4
GWS 110W Introduction to Gender 4
GWS 225 Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies 4
GWS 225W Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies 4
GWS 251 Coming of Age: Gender and Culture 4
GWS 251W Coming of Age: Gender and Culture 4
HIST 155 History of the Family in America 3
HIST 190 United States to 1877 4
HIST 190W United States to 1877 4
HIST 191 United States Since 1877 4
HIST 191W United States Since 1877 4
HLTH 211 Human Sexuality in a World of Diversity 3
HUM 281W Human Diversity and Humanities Traditions 4
KSP 220W Human Relations in a Multicultural Society 3
KSP 251 Coming of Age: Gender and Culture 3
KSP 260 Creating Global Awareness through Studying Abroad 3
MASS 260 Principles of Visual Mass Media 4
MUS 125 Pop Music USA: Jazz to Country to Blues 3
MUS 126 Pop Music USA: R & B to MTV 3
PHIL 115W Philosophy of Race, Class and Gender 3
REHB 110W Sensitivity to Disability 3
SOC 150 Social Problems 3
SOC 208 Courtship, Marriage & Family 3
SOC 209 Sociology of Human Sexualities 3
THEA 285W Theatre of Diversity 3

GOAL AREA 8: GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES

(Requires one course, 3 credits or more)

Goal: To increase students’ understanding of the growing interdependence of nations, traditions and peoples and develop their ability to apply a comparative perspective to cross-cultural social, economic, and political experiences.

Students will be able to:

(a) describe, analyze, and evaluate political, economic, humanistic, artistic, social and cultural elements which influence relations of nations and peoples in their historical and contemporary dimensions;
(b) demonstrate knowledge of cultural, social, religious and linguistic differences;
(c) analyze specific international problems illustrating cultural, economic, artistic, humanistic, social, and political differences which affect their solution;
(d) understand the role of a world citizen and the responsibility world citizens share for their common global future.

ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthropology 4
ANTH 230 Peoples and Cultures of the World 4
ANTH 240 Language and Culture 4
ANTH 260 Vampires, Werewolves, and Zombies: Folklore of Fear 3
ANTH 261 Taboos, Tattoos, and T-Shirts: Culture and Body Art 3
ART 160 Introduction to Visual Culture 3
ART 260 Art History Survey I 3
ART 261 Art History Survey II 3
ART 265W Art As Politics 3
CDIS 206 Intermediate Sign Language 3
CDIS 207 Advanced Sign Language I 3
CMST 203 Intercultural Communication 4
DANC 120 Introduction to Dance 3
DANC 120W Introduction to Dance 3
DANC 225 Worlds of Dance 3
ECON 314W Current Economic Issues 3
EET 118 Electricity - Generation, Usage & Green Alternatives 3
EET 125 Perspective on Technology 3
ENG 125 International Children's Literature 4
ENG 146 Introduction to Shakespeare 4
ENG 212W Perspectives in World Literature 4
ENVR 101 Perspectives in Environmental Science 4
FILM 334W International Cinema 4
FREN 101 Elementary French I 5
FREN 102 Elementary French II 5
FREN 201 Intermediate French I 4
FREN 202 Intermediate French II 4
GEOG 100 Elements of Geography 3
GEOG 103 Introductory Cultural Geography 3
GER 101 Elementary German I 4
GER 102 Elementary German II 4
GER 150W The German-Speaking Countries: An Interdisciplinary Introduction 4
GER 201 Intermediate German I 4
GER 202 Intermediate German II 4
GWS 220 Global Perspectives on Women and Change 4
GWS 220W Global Perspectives on Women and Change 4
HIST 160 Introduction to Traditional East Asian Civilization 4
HIST 170 Ancient World Civilization to 1500 4
HIST 170W Ancient World Civilization to 1500 4
HIST 171 World Civilization, 1500-Present 4
HIST 171W World Civilization, 1500-Present 4
HIST 181 European History: 1648 to the Present 4
HIST 181W European History: 1648 to the Present 4
HUM 101W Introduction to Humanities and the Search for Meaning 4
HUM 155 Global Humanities I 4
HUM 156 Global Humanities II 4
HUM 282W Global Perspectives and Humanities Traditions 4
KSP 260 Creating Global Awareness through Studying Abroad 3
MUS 328 Music of the World 3
MUSE 200W Introduction to Museum Studies 3
PHIL 205W Culture, Identity, and Diversity 3
PHIL 358W Eastern Philosophy 3
POL 106 Politics in the World Community 3
POL 234 Model United Nations 3
SCAN 101 Elementary Norwegian I 4
SCAN 102 Elementary Norwegian II 4
SCAN 111 Elementary Swedish I 4
SCAN 112 Elementary Swedish II 4
SCAN 150W The Nordic Countries: Interdisciplinary Introduction 4
SCAN 251W Scandinavian Cultures: The Sami 4
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3
SOC 101W Introduction to Sociology 3
SOWK 255 Global Responses to Human Need 3
SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish I 4
SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish II 4
SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I 4
SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II 4
SPAN 210W Composition and Conversation 4
URBS 100 Introduction to the City 3

GOAL AREA 9: ETHICAL AND CIVIC RESPONSIBILITY

(Requires one course, 3 credits or more)

Goal: To develop students’ capacity to identify, dis cuss and reflect upon the ethical dimensions of political, social, and personal life and to understand the ways in which they can exercise responsible and productive citizenship. While there are diverse views of social justice or the common good in a pluralistic society, students should learn that responsible citizenship requires them to develop skills to understand their own and others positions, be part of the free exchange of ideas, and function as public minded citizens.

Students will be able to:

(a) examine, articulate, and apply their own ethical views;
(b) understand and apply core concepts (e.g. politics, rights and obligations, justice, liberty) to specific issues;
(c) analyze and reflect on the ethical dimensions of legal, social, and scientific issues;
(d) recognize the diversity of political motivations and interests of others;
(e) identify ways to exercise the rights and responsibilities of citizenship.

BLAW 131 Consumer Law & Ethics 3
CHEM 131 Forensic Science 3
CMST 300 Ethics and Free Speech 4
CORR 106 Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems 3
CORR 255 Juvenile Delinquency 3
CS 201W Artificial Intelligence & Science Fiction 4
ENG 213W Perspectives: Ethics and Civic Responsibility in Literature 4
GWS 120 Violence and Gender 4
GWS 120W Violence and Gender 4
GWS 220 Global Perspectives on Women and Change 4
GWS 220W Global Perspectives on Women and Change 4
HIST 180 European History to 1648 4
HIST 180W European History to 1648 4
IT 100 Introduction to Computing and Applications 4
IT 202W Computers in Society 4
KSP 101 Exploring and Applying Values 3
KSP 200 Critical Issues in Public Education 3
KSP 250 Social Justice in School and Community 3
MASS 110 Introduction to Mass Media 4
NPL 273 Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector 3
PHIL 120W Introduction to Ethics 3
PHIL 222W Medical Ethics 3
PHIL 224W Business Ethics 3
PHIL 226W Environmental Ethics 3
PHIL 240W Law, Justice & Society 3
PHIL 321W Social & Political Philosophy 3
PHIL 322W Ethical Theory 3
PHIL 323W Philosophy of Economics 3
POL 101 Introduction to Public Life 3
POL 111 United States Government 3
SOC 255 Juvenile Delinquency 3
SOWK 180W Social Welfare Services 3
URBS 230 Community Leadership 3
URBS 230W Community Leadership 3

GOAL AREA 10: PEOPLE AND THE ENVIRONMENT

(Requires one course, 3 credits or more)

Goal: To increase students’ understanding of today’s complex environmental challenges. Students will examine the interrelatedness of human society and the natural environment. Knowledge of both bio-physical principles and psychosocial cultural systems is the foundation for integrative and critical thinking about environmental issues.

Students will be able to:

(a) explain the basic structure and function of various natural ecosystems and of human adaptive strategies within those systems;
(b) discern and analyze patterns and interrelationships of the bio-physical and psycho-social cultural systems;
(c) critically discern and analyze individual, social, and ecological dimensions of health;
(d) describe the basic institutional arrangements (social, legal, political, economic, health, ethical, religious) that are evolving to deal with environmental and natural resource challenges;
(e) evaluate critically environmental and natural re source issues in light of understandings about interrelation ships, ecosystems, and institutions;
(f) propose and assess alternative solutions to environmental problems;
(g) articulate and defend the actions they would take on various environmental issues.

AIS 360 Indigenous Peoples and Envrionmental Struggles 3
ANTH 102 Ancient Peoples 4
ANTH 210 Introduction to Archaeology 4
EEC 205 Service Learning: Society and the Environment 3
ENVR 101 Perspectives in Environmental Science 4
GEOG 100 Elements of Geography 3
GEOG 101 Introductory Physical Geography 3
GEOG 210W Landscapes and Places 3
GEOL 100 Our Geologic Environment  
GEOL 108 Oceans of the World 3
GEOL 121 Physical Geology 4
HLTH 101 Health and the Environment 3
PHIL 226W Environmental Ethics 3
RPLS 282 Wildlife as a Recreational Resource 3
SOC 360 Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Struggles 3
URBS 150 Sustainable Communities 3

GOAL AREA 11: PERFORMANCE AND PARTICIPATION

(Requires 2-3 credits)

Goal: To prepare students for responsible and effective participation in groups and communities.

Students will be able to:

(a) participate effectively in a variety of artistic, education, political, recreational, health and public service, or social service settings;
(b) interact with others of another culture in its indigenous setting through a structured experience;
(c) participate cooperatively in group athletic activity or artistic performance.

ANTH 280 Engaged Anthropology: Service Learning 3
CDIS 205 Beginning Sign Language 3
CMST 220 Forensics 1-4
CMST 310 Performance of Literature 4
DANC 123 Beginning Jazz Dance 2
DANC 125 Afro-Caribbean Dance Forms 2
DANC 126 Beginning Ballet 2
DANC 127 Beginning Tap Dance 2
DANC 128 Beginning Modern Dance 2
DANC 223 Intermediate Jazz Dance 2
DANC 225 Worlds of Dance 3
DANC 226 Intermediate Ballet 2
DANC 227 Intermediate Tap Dance 2
DANC 228 Intermediate Modern Dance 2
DANC 229 Kinetic Learning in the Classroom 1
DANC 328 Advanced Modern Dance 2
EEC 222W Human Relations in a Multicultural Society 3
ENG 242W Introduction To Creative Writing 4
EXED 202 Introduction to Experiential Education 3
FILM 217 Introduction to Film Production 4
HLTH 210 First Aid & CPR 3
HP 101 Adapted Exercise 1
HP 103 Fitness for Living 1
HP 104 Adult Fitness 1
HP 105 Beginner and Advanced Beginner Swimming 1
HP 114 Billiards and Bowling 1
HP 117 Aerobic Conditioning 1
HP 130 Self-Defense for Women 1
HP 138 Beginning Horsemanship 1
HP 139 Winter Survival 1
HP 143 Aqua Exercise 1
HP 145 Aquatic Conditioning and Water Polo 1
HP 146 Intercollegiate Bowling 1
HP 147 Intercollegiate Cross Country 1
HP 148 Intercollegiate Softball 1
HP 149 Intercollegiate Volleyball 1
HP 150 Intercollegiate Wrestling 1
HP 152 Intercollegiate Track and Field 1
HP 153 Intercollegiate Swimming 1
HP 154 Intercollegiate Football 1
HP 155 Intercollegiate Basketball 1
HP 156 Intercollegiate Baseball 1
HP 157 Intercollegiate Golf 1
HP 158 Intercollegiate Tennis 1
HP 159 Intercollegiate Hockey 1
HP 161 Intercollegiate Soccer 1
HP 166 Team Game Skills 1
HP 174 Individual-Dual Activities 1
HP 175 Fitness Activities 1
HP 176 Lifetime Activities I 1
HP 177 Lifetime Activities II 1
HP 178 Social, Folk and Square Dance Techniques 1
HP 179 Winter Activities 1
HP 180 Introduction to Handball 1
HP 181 Advanced Handball 1
HP 182 Aquatic Skills 1
HP 190 Sport Activities 1
HP 241 Sailing 1
HP 242 Canoeing 1
HP 245 Intermediate Swimming 1
HP 248 Stroke Analysis 1
HP 250 Lifeguard Training 2
HP 252 Officiating Theory 2
HP 257 Water Safety Instructor (WSI) 2
HP 291 Concepts of Fitness 2
KSP 220W Human Relations in a Multicultural Society 3
MSL 210 Army Physical Fitness 1
MUS 101 Concert Choir 0-1
MUS 102 University Chorale 0-1
MUS 103 Chamber Singers 0-1
MUS 104 Opera 0 or 2
MUS 106 Vocal Jazz Ensemble 0-1
MUS 111 Wind Ensemble 0-1
MUS 112 Symphonic Band 0-1
MUS 113 Pep Band I 1
MUS 114 Drum Corp 1
MUS 115 Jazz Ensemble 0-1
MUS 116 University Orchestra 0-1
MUS 117 Theatre Orchestra 1
MUS 118 Jazz Combo 0-1
MUS 119 Ensemble 0-1
NURS 101W Courage, Caring, and Team Building 3
POL 101 Introduction to Public Life 3
RPLS 278 Leisure and Lifestyle 3
THEA 102 Theatre Activity: Acting 1-2
THEA 103 Theatre Activity: Management 1-2
THEA 105 Theatre Activity: Stagecraft 1-2
THEA 107 Theatre Activity: Costume 1-2
THEA 108 Theatre Activity: Lighting 1-2
THEA 109 Theatre Activity: Sound 1-2
THEA 115 Experiencing Theatre 3
URBS 230 Community Leadership 3
URBS 230W Community Leadership 3

GOAL AREA 12: FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE

(Requires 0-1 credits)

Goal: To promote further development of student success skills, such as reading, writing and speaking; help students gain intellectual confidence; build in the expectation of academic success; and to provide assistance in making the transition to the University.

Students will be able to:

(a) experience higher personal expectations of his/her ability to meaning fully participate in academic life;
(b) define and give examples of critical thinking;
(c) interact with other students regarding academic matters;
(d) affirm that careful thinking is an important aspect of the educational process;
(e) make a comfortable transition to college life.

CIVE 100 Explorations in Engineering 1
EE 100 Explorations in Engineering 1
FYEX 100 First Year Seminar 1
ME 100 Explorations in Engineering 1

GOAL AREA 13: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

(Requires 0-2 credits)

Goals: To familiarize students with the tools, concepts and societal impact of information technology and to develop the skills necessary to use this technology critically and effectively.

Students will be able to:

(a) use electronic information technology ethically and responsibly;
(b) access and retrieve information through electronic media, evaluating the accuracy and authenticity of that information;
(c) create, manage, organize and communicate information through electronic media;
(d) demonstrate a working knowledge of information technology terms and concepts;
(e) understand how computers function and the limits of computation and information technology;
(f) recognize changing technologies and make informed choices in their use.

EET 115 Understanding Computers 3
EET 116 Communications-Past, Present & Future 3
ENG 271W Technical Communication 4
ENG 272W Business Communication 4
IT 100 Introduction to Computing and Applications 4
IT 202W Computers in Society 4