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Minnesota State University, Mankato

Minnesota State University, Mankato
Office of Institutional Planning, Research and Assessment

GE Category 1 Rubric

Page address: http://www.mnsu.edu/assessment/gened/GEAssessCat1.html

Category 1: Communication

Goal: Produce students who are able to communicate effectively in oral and written forms.

Objectives/Outcomes:
Following the Completion of Category 1 of the General Education Program, students can:
1. Prepare and present effective public oral communication
2. Create effective college-level written communication
3. Write effectively in content-area courses

Population:
O/O 1-3:
Sample sections of ENG 101, SPEE 100 and 102, and Writing-Intensive Courses

Who does the Assessment?
O/O 1:
Speech Communication and CDIS faculty

O/O 2:
English Department faculty

O/O 3:
Writing Intensive Course Instructor Group

Assessment Rubric for O/O #1: Effective Public Communication

1 Students fail to demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate in public. Speeches and presentations were not given or were of such poor quality as to indicate a lack of knowledge and ability, and students failed to demonstrate acceptable interpersonal skills.
2 Students demonstrate the ability to communicate in public by presenting a minimum of two speeches, engaging in interpersonal communication, and by taking part in a group presentation. The speeches fail to demonstrate appropriate topic selection, and the topics are not developed as well as they should be, or are too broad for the occasion and time constraints; the structure of the speech is not readily apparent, and use of transitions and signposting is lacking; few if any sources are used and cited in the speech, and those used lack credibility; verbal and nonverbal skills are generally unacceptable, and there are many lapses such as the overuse of fillers, lack of eye contact, gestures and movement, and the rate and/or volume of the delivery makes it hard to follow the speech. Group presentations fail to demonstrate appropriate topic selection, and development of the topic is limited; the structure of the presentations fails to follow an orderly pattern, and there is limited use of transitions and signposting; few if any sources are used and orally cited in the presentation, and those used lack credibility; verbal and nonverbal skills are generally unacceptable, and there are many lapses such as the overuse of fillers, lack of eye contact, gestures and movement, and the rate and/or volume of the delivery makes it hard to follow the presentation. 
3 Students demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate in public by presenting a minimum of two speeches, engaging in interpersonal communication, and taking part in a group presentation. The speeches demonstrate appropriate topic selection, but the topics are not developed as well as they should be, or are too broad for the occasion and time constraints; the structure of the speech is apparent, but use of transitions and signposting is lacking; some sources are used and cited in the speech, but they are too few or some lack credibility; verbal and nonverbal skills are generally acceptable, but there are some lapses such as use of fillers and/or lack of eye contact and gestures. Group presentations demonstrate generally appropriate topic selection, but development of the topic is limited in that it is too broad or too narrow; the structure of the presentations generally follows an orderly pattern, but there is limited use of transitions and signposting; some sources are used and orally cited in the presentation, but they are too few or lack credibility; verbal and nonverbal skills are generally acceptable, but there are some lapses such as use of fillers and/or lack of eye contact and gestures.
4 Students demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate in public by presenting a minimum of two speeches, engaging in interpersonal communication, and taking part in a group presentation. The speeches demonstrate appropriate topic selection and development, the structure of the speeches follows an orderly pattern, sufficient sources are used and orally cited in the speech, and acceptable verbal and nonverbal skills are demonstrated. Group presentations demonstrate appropriate topic selection and development, the structure of the presentations follows an orderly pattern, sufficient sources are used and orally cited in the presentation, and acceptable verbal and nonverbal skills are demonstrated.

Level of Mastery
For year 1, baseline data will be gathered.

Assessment Rubric for O/O #2: Effective College-Level Written Communication

1 This essay demonstrates that the student has mastered neither fundamental research skills nor fundamental writing skills.
2 While general writing skills are satisfactory, this essay demonstrates that the student has not mastered, has in fact only begun to learn, fundamental research skills (the student has not found sufficient resources, the student does not paraphrase nor summarize nor quote correctly, and the student does not follow an accepted procedure for documentation.
3 While there are some deficiencies, this essay indicates that the student should be able to write satisfactory papers in other classes. Common problems in such essays are significant but poorly limited topics, some unreliable sources, an argument that is worthwhile making but not consistently logical nor organized nor developed, an understanding of an accepted procedure for documentation such as MLA but problems in its use, and enough errors in mechanics to interrupt the reading.
4 While not perfect, this essay demonstrates unquestionably that the student has mastered the skills taught in English 101. The topic is significant, its development is specific and authoritative and conclusive and authoritatively documented, the discussion is logical and orderly, and the language is appropriate, clear and correct.

Level of Mastery
For year 1, baseline data will be gathered.

Assessment Rubric for O/O #3: Content-area written communication

1 This writing sample indicates that the student is unable to write effectively in content-area courses.
2 While there are some strengths, this writing sample indicates that the student is generally unable to write successfully in content area courses. Common problems include inappropriate and/or undeveloped topics, use of unreliable sources, or failure to use any sources, poorly developed arguments or presentation of irrelevant information, poorly organized or unorganized structure, poor use or failure to use appropriate documentation, and errors in mechanics that distort the message.
3 While there are some deficiencies, student writing indicates that the student can write satisfactory papers in content area courses. Common problems in such writings include appropriate but poorly developed topics, use of some unreliable sources, an argument that is worthwhile making but not consistently logical nor organized nor developed, an understanding of an accepted procedure for documentation such as MLA or APA but problems in its use, and enough errors in mechanics to interrupt the reading.
4 While not perfect, student writing demonstrates unquestionably that the student has used the skills taught in English 101 to write effectively in the content area. The writing shows appropriate topic selection and development, the arguments or information provided in the writing are supported both in the structure of the writing and/or by use of outside sources, the discussion of the topic is logical and orderly, and the language is appropriate, clear and correct.

Level of Mastery
For year 1, baseline data will be gathered