This is a threaded discussion page for the International Stuttering Awareness Day Online Conference paper, A
Perspective on Summer Camps for Children Who Stutter: 1991-1998 by Ellen Bennet and Jenna
Batik. 

Welcome

From: Ellen Bennett
Date: 10/1/98
Time: 1:54:20 PM
Remote Name: 129.108.2.198

Comments

Just a note to welcome everyone to the conference. I look forward to the exchange which will take place over the next
few weeks. A special thank you goes to Michael and Judy for all their hard work putting this conference together.

Children who stutter

From: Kathleen Roetzel
Date: 10/2/98
Time: 12:07:04 PM
Remote Name: 204.72.77.126

Comments

In your article you mentioned giving interns a specific curriculum to use when working with the campers. What was the
curriculum that your used?


Re: Children who stutter

From: Ellen Bennett
Date: 10/2/98
Time: 12:20:45 PM
Remote Name: 129.108.2.198

Comments

I designed a curriculum whnich follows an integrated approach to the treatment of stuttering. Incorporating both small
group and large group activities, the campers discuss the normal speaking process, how we interfer with this process,
ways in which we may stutter (providing specific terms the child can use to describe their stuttering is very important).
We address what Gene Cooper describes as the ABC's of stuttering treatment: affective, behavioral, and cognitive
components. I have outline various activities in the form of daily agendas so that everyone is doing the same type of
task, albet implementing the activities in their own creative ways. We wanted the university interns to concentrate on
their interactions with the children and not on what they were going to be doing. We inserviced all interns on the
curriculum before the camp started so they had plenty of time to prepare materials, etc. Our feedback from the university
interns has been very positive.


stuttering:╩ Camp environment

From: Slp in CT
Date: 10/3/98
Time: 5:56:44 PM
Remote Name: 152.163.204.204

Comments

How was your camp funded? What were specific payments made by campers? What were SLPs paid? How
did you decide who were eligible campers?


Re: stuttering:╩ Camp environment

From: Ellen Bennett
Date: 10/5/98
Time: 11:41:56 AM
Remote Name: 129.108.2.198

Comments

Our camp is funded through EYS (Extended Year Service) mandates by the state. To be considered for EYS,
you must be able to document regression over the summer if therapy is not provided, and must have
significant impact on the student's ability to function. All campers must have an active IEP to attend camp.
Through our work on advocating for children who stutter, educating (especially in the area of relapse and
support)those in a position to make decisions about this program. I have the exact figures from the 98 camp
but they are at home. I will send them later. But the SLPs received their regular salary and the overall budget
was around $12,000. We received close to $12,000 in medicaid moneys (SHARS reimbursement) due to the
population we serve. So, in reality, the district didn't have to foot any of the bill. 


Summer camp for people who stutter

From: Bernie Weiner
Date: 10/4/98
Time: 4:14:09 PM
Remote Name: 205.188.195.27

Comments

Are you at all familiar with the Shady Trails camp which was sponsored by the University of Michigan ? Back
in the 60's, I spent two complete summers there. This was an eight week camp, mainly for people who
stuttered. I found that I would return home almost completely fluent, only to regress due to the lack of
follow-up work. What type of continuity is offered to the campers in your program? I feel that it is extreamly
important to have some type of follow-up work, whether in a support group setting or individual therapy.

Re: Summer camp for people who stutter

From: Ellen Bennett
Date: 10/5/98
Time: 11:52:39 AM
Remote Name: 129.108.2.198

Comments

Bernie, The camp that we run does not emphasize the development of fluency for just the reasons you note. It
is extrememly difficult to expect children in 5 or 8 days to gain control over their speech and then maintain it
when they return home. This is an unrealistic expectation and just sets them up for possible failure (most
likely failure) in the long run. The purpose of the camps is to provide an unconditional, accepting environment
in which children can be themselves regardless of how they talk. There is no teasing, no corrections, no
demeaning suggestions like "just try to use your easy speech". And yet, in this environment, the children learn
about stuttering, begin to see the many faces of the stuttering monster, begin to confront it is socially accepting
ways, and hopefully, become desensitized to stuttering. We follow Dean Williams ideas around the
"discovery" process, assisting the children through fun activities to challenge themselves. It is our belief that
children, in order to make the necessary changes in their speech, must first know about the normal speaking
process, know about stuttering in general, know about their type of stuttering, and be able to insert easy
stutters into their speech so they can "feel" the difference between hard and easy speech. In the camp setting,
the SLPs are guided in how to proivde this type of suppoprt and they become more comfortable with working
with this population.



Re: Summer camp for people who stutter

From: Joe
Date: 4/9/99
Time: 1:08:32 PM
Remote Name: 152.163.204.193

Comments

I worked at Shady Trails for two summers, the camp closed in 1995 and no longer is run by U of M, it
was a day camp last summer and is owned by Tim Allen........

summer camp

From: Katie Passmore
Date: 10/5/98
Time: 10:21:02 AM
Remote Name: 209.30.46.50

Comments

Good paper! Anyway, I'm glad I got the chance to experience what you wrote about. Camp was the thing that
kept me going. School is really hard for me, so having interactions with the kids helped me to buckle down so
I can graduate and do what I love to do. Well I'm off to check out what Yaruss has to say. Katie 


stuttering camp

From: jeff in Iowa
Date: 10/5/98
Time: 1:25:38 PM
Remote Name: 198.247.157.60

Comments

I enjoyed this article, having just spent part of my last summer working at a similiar camp. 

What do you do to involve school SLPs at the child's school in the process? 

What kind of follow-up do you have with the children during the school year? 

How does the summer camp impact the child's IEP?



Re: stuttering camp

From: Ellen Bennett
Date: 10/6/98
Time: 11:20:52 AM
Remote Name: 129.108.2.198

Comments

Jeff, 

Thanks for the comments. Originally, each camper took a notebook of the camps activities back to his/her
school SLP and showed them what they had learned over the summer. The fluency support in this district has
always been very good. At each 6 weeks meeting, there was an opportunity to discuss the students with each
other. More importantly, as the Fluency Specialist for the District, I was available to go to the student's home
campus and demonstrate or assist the campus therapist in any way needed. At first, I was called out alot and
then this subsided as the clinicians gained confidence in this area. Frequent inservice and sharing of ideas at
the meetings also helped to promote this confidence. 

As far as systematic follow-up, we did not have any (as of yet). Right now, the district does not have a
fluency specialist on board and therefore, it is particularly hard for me to follow-up on some of the clients we
worked with. I no longer am employeed with the district, just at the university. 

With regards to the IEPs, at the end of the camp, each therapist completes a checklist of how the child
performed on the tasks outlined in the curriculum. This then goes to the home therapist to be inserted into their
speech records. This also provides feedback to the home therapist. 

Ideally, we would like to have more systematic follow-up. However, we have not been able to manage it
within the system constraints. Ellen 

Summer camp

From: Dani Schwartz
Date: 10/6/98
Time: 12:40:39 PM
Remote Name: 206.42.175.94

Comments

I enjoyed reading this article. It is interesting to hear what other people have to say about the summer camp.


Stuttering Summer Program

From: Molly Tami
Date: 10/8/98
Time: 1:15:58 PM
Remote Name: 205.188.192.23

Comments

I was very encouraged to read your article and hear about your camp! It sounds wonderful and serves a very
important need. This past August, I spend the month with my 8 years old at the Institute for Stuttering
Treatment and Research in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada where he participated in an intensive clinic that was
geared towards achieving and maintained fluency skills (which I realize your camp is not). It was a fabulous
program and has produced great results. I was unable to find a comparable program in the U.S., which is
disappointing. We need more camps and summer programs of this type and of your type, to help our children
that stutter and to train SLP to work in this area. Are you optimistic that more summer programs/camps will be
developed in the future? Thanks for your article and keep up your important work. 


Re: Stuttering Summer Program

From: Ellen Bennett
Date: 10/9/98
Time: 3:21:37 PM
Remote Name: 129.108.2.198

Comments

Molly, 

Thanks for the words of encouragement. I have been trying to promote these summer camps for the past six to
seven years because I see a great need, also. I am not sure of the outcome of these efforts though. It would be
wonderful to see an increased interest in projects such as this. Super for SLPs and super for kids. 


selection of campers

From: Joann Bergemann
Date: 10/8/98
Time: 3:06:30 PM
Remote Name: 134.29.30.79

Comments

Can the same kids come to the camp each year? If so, it would be interesting to follow them in a research
study. 


Re: selection of campers

From: Ellen Bennett
Date: 10/9/98
Time: 3:18:09 PM
Remote Name: 129.108.2.198

Comments

Yes. Campers can repeat camp as often as they like. we started tracking the "repeaters" (just a pun) but there
are too many other factors in their lives which would influence their performance. But just the fact that they
want to come to camp next year says something positive aobut the experience.



Observations from a 98 Camp Intern

From: Laura Straub
Date: 10/8/98
Time: 10:48:06 PM
Remote Name: 209.194.74.113

Comments

Some observations from a 98 Summer Camp SLP student intern: 1. Camp provided interns extensive
exposure to different types/level of severity of stuttering within one's group (campers are grouped by age).
e.g. My group had a severe CWS, and I was not prepared for my (emotional) reaction to hearing her initially.
It was almost painful. 2. Group "Show & Tell" exercises (in front of entire camp) were moving experiences.
Some campers who on Day 1 would barely say their name, volunteered for Show & Tell and upon completion
were greeted with thunderous applause. 3. Opportunities for interaction between SLPs and interns as well as
between interns was invaluable (dare I say the "networking" word here?). I ended up becoming friends with
"our SLP," and we often discuss SLP issues, community and school trends as well as share grad. school
experiences -- she is somewhat of a mentor. In addition, I got to know a fellow classmate much better because
of our planning sessions outside the camp and of course our need for teamwork all week long as we
co-created and presented lessons and activities. 4. On Parent's Day (the last day of camp) I was provided a
glimpse at the relationship between the parent's reaction to their child's stuttering and the child's own reaction
to it. Of course, this was an extremely limited observation, but there was a set of parents who did not appear
nearly as accepting of their child as a CWS as other camper's parents. Their child seemed to have a great deal
of difficulty getting up the courage to speak and the child's stuttering was one of the most severe of the
campers. It drove home to me the point of the camp -- acceptance of stuttering as "OK" is crucial to its
treatment. 



"Stuttering Camps"

From: Chuck Goldman
Date: 10/9/98
Time: 4:48:30 PM
Remote Name: 152.163.205.59

Comments

It's good to know that your program has increased so dramatically in numbers. I'm somewhat surprised that
many parents feel "comfortable" sending their children to a "stuttering" camp. How were these families
recruitred and what kind of preliminary work needed to be done? There is certainly no doubt beginning SLP's
and student SLP's would be eager for the opportunities.

Re: "Stuttering Camps"

From: Ellen Bennett
Date: 10/12/98
Time: 11:39:53 AM
Remote Name: 129.108.2.198

Comments

Chuck, 

Good point. Each child is selected to attend by their home therapist who does the initial contact with the
parents to gain their support. In our district, we have worked very hard to "get stuttering out in the open"
through inservice opportunities, parent support groups, and the work of the fluency specialist. When SLPs
and CWS feel supported and have a resource to go to when helped in needed, all benefit. During some of the
years, we had a parent meeting in the evening where we discussed stuttering and provided an outlet for
parents to expresses their concerns and ideas. These meetings were attended by some parents and the
representativeness in attendance varied year from year. This last year, the coordinators did not have a evening
parent meeting. But in the previous year, I did and we had about 20 people in attendance (including siblings).
I believe that, even if only one parent attends, the meeting is a success. I don't really like to look at the number
end of it.



Age for participation in summer camp program

From: Michael Sugarman
Date: 10/10/98
Time: 10:32:27 AM
Remote Name: 134.29.30.79

Comments

I wish I had the opportunity to go to camp. What age do you feel the child is appropriate to go to camp? This
spring we considered sending rebekah to overnight camp. Rebekah is 7 years old. A developmental
psychologist suggested to wait til she was 11 years old.

Re: Age for participation in summer camp program

From: Ellen Bennett
Date: 10/12/98
Time: 11:43:59 AM
Remote Name: 129.108.2.198

Comments

Michael, 

Please keep in mind that this camp is not sleep over camp. The child come in the morning (8:15+-) and then
leave at 2:30-3:00. We have included children as young as 5 in the camp and have found that they learn
through their experience just as much as the older campers. (Theraspy activities are modified for this younger
group). I am really not to sure about an appropriate age for overnight, week-long camps!

stuttering camp

From: Emma Millis
Date: 10/11/98
Time: 12:03:59 AM
Remote Name: 24.92.96.23

Comments

Your article on the stuttering camp gave a great insight to a wonderful program supported by devoted
individuals in the community. I am looking forward to being a part of the program and a part of a new life
experience.


Summer Camp Experience

From: Dianna Andrew
Date: 10/11/98
Time: 4:36:30 PM
Remote Name: 209.30.46.80

Comments

I found camp to be a fantastic experience. It was a great addition to my graduate school training. I do have 1
suggestion; limit the sugar snacks. I found it very challenging to handle 6 boys ages 4 to 7.


Re: Summer Camp Experience

From: Ellen Bennett
Date: 10/12/98
Time: 11:45:46 AM
Remote Name: 129.108.2.198

Comments

Dianna, 

I totally agree with you. Working with young 6-7 year old boys is challenging enough without adding the
influence of "sugar" on their activity level. I will pass your thoughts onto to the next year coordinator.


Summer Camp

From: Veronica Rallis
Date: 10/11/98
Time: 5:19:11 PM
Remote Name: 209.30.46.40

Comments

This past summer, I participated in a week long, stuttering camp. As a graduate student, I felt it provided a
great learning experience. I was able to interact with children who stuttered and learn first hand about therapy
strategies, stuttering behaviors and severities of stuttering. It was great to apply the theory that is presented in
the classroom to actual situations in camp. The camp provides children who stutter a relaxed atmoshere where
they can interact with other children who stutter and become more accepting of their stuttering. It was a truly
enjoyable experience where I learned so much about how stuttering affects children first hand. 


Re: Summer Camp

From: Ellen Bennett
Date: 10/12/98
Time: 11:47:47 AM
Remote Name: 129.108.2.198

Comments

Veronica, 

We strongly believe that the camp provides an opportunity for university students to learn, in a hands-on
manner, how to work with children who stutter. Your comments further confirm our beliefs and encourage us
to continue. Thanks.


Getting Involved

From: Andy Floyd╩╩╩ a624301f@edinboro.edu
Date: 10/12/98
Time: 11:15:57 PM
Remote Name: 208.166.66.21

Comments

Ellen (Dr. Bennet :) 

Hi! Your article was great! As a second year SLP grad, I would love to have this kind of opportunity. I was
wondering what the chances would be for the camp to have students from out-of state, like me? Depending on
the timing of the camp, I'd no longer be a student, but I'd love to help out in some way. Do you miss
Colorado at all? I do.

Re: Getting Involved

From: Ellen Bennett
Date: 10/13/98
Time: 12:32:46 PM
Remote Name: 129.108.2.198

Comments

Andy, 

Nice to hear from you. Having others help out in the camp is not problematic for me at all. One year, we had
Mary Johns from San Antonio, come for a couple of days. Towards the end of April, I should have the dates
of the camp from the school district. So keep in touch. 

Ellen


Fluency Camp

From: Rachel Landeros
Date: 10/13/98
Time: 1:04:49 PM
Remote Name: 129.108.29.110

Comments

I greatly enjoyed your article and look forward to some day being a participate in the fluency camp.


Summer Camp

From: Brenda Ortiz
Date: 10/14/98
Time: 12:57:05 AM
Remote Name: 209.154.99.224

Comments

I enjoyed reading this article. "Summer Camp" sounds like a great experience for everyone involved. I regret
not being able to participate in this year's camp but hope I will have the opportunity to participate in the future.
I also wondered if campers have a way to keep in touch during the school year or have some type of
newsletter in order to help the campers stay in touch as a whole group.


Re: Summer Camp

From: Ellen Bennett
Date: 10/14/98
Time: 1:06:26 PM
Remote Name: 129.108.2.198

Comments

Brenda, That is a very good suggestion. I know that Charlie Healey at Nebraska has a summer camp that
produces a newsletter and I think they have set up a way for the campers to keep in touch with one another.
Maybe if Charlie, Gayle, or Lisa read this, they can respond with their ideas. 

Ellen Bennett


Summer Camps for Children Who Stutter

From: J. O'Reilly
Date: 10/14/98
Time: 12:09:35 PM
Remote Name: 207.109.214.34

Comments

Have you done any research as to whether these positive experiences and feelings of self-acceptance at camp
carried over into the less sheltered environment of their world outside of camp? I enjoyed your article.
Thanks. article. 


Re: Summer Camps for Children Who Stutter

From: Ellen Bennett
Date: 10/14/98
Time: 1:10:58 PM
Remote Name: 129.108.2.198

Comments

J., No we haven't done systematic research on the long-term carryover of attitudes established during camp.
Since the child come from such a varied background with so many different confounding variables, research
findings would be highly suspect and open to much criticism. If someone has any suggestions on how to
design such a study, I would be very grateful. My research background is very limited and I have not pursued
this type of research recently. 

Ellen 


Re: Summer Camps for Children Who Stutter

From: Les Anderson
Date: 10/16/98
Time: 12:25:34 AM
Remote Name: 209.167.123.233

Comments

Ellen, 

I would suggest that for any information or questions about research you may want to contact the Institute For
Stuttering Treatment and Research in Edmonton, Alberta. This clinic is known throughout the world for is
status in research in regards to stuttering and children who stutter. The clinic's Executive Director is Deborah
Kully and she would be more than willing to share with you her knowledge of researching such a project as
outlined above.  

Additional ideas for BCA summer camp

From: Les Anderson
Date: 10/14/98
Time: 2:04:43 PM
Remote Name: 134.29.30.79

Comments

Ellen 

I have been following with great interest your paper on a summer camp for children. We at the British
Columbia Assoc. of People Who Stutter are in the planning stages of a summer camp for children who stutter.
What we plan to integrate into the camp criteria are seminars for the parents and brothers and sisters of those
who stutter. For some yet to be explained reason, discussion about a child's stutter, in a family setting, is still
a taboo topic. We feel that this leads to much misunderstanding between the parents and brothers and sisters
about their sibling's affliction. We also hope to include a hands off observation study for student or registered
SLPs who wish to take part. Many of the ideas that are being discussed and passed around in this discussion
group have been a real boost for us. If anyone has any other ideas on what may be beneficial for a camp for
those who stutter, please feel free to e-mail your suggestions to me. 

Les Anderson E-mail lander@cancom.net 

President 

British Columbia Assoc. of People Who Stutter 


Re: Additional ideas for BCA summer camp

From: Ellen Bennett
Date: 10/14/98
Time: 2:30:28 PM
Remote Name: 129.108.2.198

Comments

Les, 

Its great to hear what you are planning up north. I would be more than happy to send you a copy of our camp
curriculum (though it changes each year). Perhaps some of the ideas you will find interesting. Also, I would
be very happy to discuss your camp with you and be there to problem solve the "how to's". We have tried
various types of activities, individual, group and family based with varying degrees of success. Let me know
how I can contribute to your camp. 

Thanks-- Ellen 


Re: Additional ideas for BCA summer camp

From: Les Anderson
Date: 10/16/98
Time: 12:16:52 AM
Remote Name: 209.167.123.233

Comments

Ellen, 

Thank you so very much for your generous offer of help. With out a doubt, we will be in contact with you in
the near future. We will need your E-mail or snail mail address to contact you. I have forwarded your paper to
our camp committee members and they were very impressed and interested in its contents. Your paper has
already given us many insights into what to do and not to do but we know we are a long ways from being
experts in the field of camp organizing. 

Les Anderson 

Re: Additional ideas for BCA summer camp

From: Ellen Bennett
Date: 10/16/98
Time: 11:41:34 AM
Remote Name: 129.108.2.198

Comments

Les, 

Indeed, keep in touch. My e-mail is ebennett@utep.edu and my address is the following: Ellen Bennett, Ph.D.
University of Texas 1101 North Campbell El Paso, Texas 79902 

I look forward to discussing camp ideas with you and your group. It is GREAT to hear about other
opportunities, like camps, for children who stutter. This is what we are all about. Ellen 


Re: Additional ideas for╩ summer camp

From: Lee Caggiano
Date: 10/20/98
Time: 7:12:33 AM
Remote Name: 205.188.193.34

Comments

Ellen 

The ideas that are being shared in this discussion have such possibilities. Could I also get a copy of your
camp's curriculum? I am sure many of the ideas can be applied to support groups for children/teens. Thanks
for this opportunity. 

Lee Caggiano 


Summer camp

From: Erin Pickering
Date: 10/18/98
Time: 11:37:10 PM
Remote Name: 160.94.213.194

Comments

I was wondering how much, if any, time was able to be spent on helping the children in finding ways in
which to extend the sense of empowerment they gained through the camp experience into the "real
world"(such as the classroom or the playground)? How were the children encouraged to facilitate this?

Re: Summer camp

From: Ellen Bennett
Date: 10/23/98
Time: 1:11:26 PM
Remote Name: 129.108.2.198

Comments

Erin, 

We are looking into this aspect. At UTEP, we are thinking of establishing a post-camp speciality clinic that
would continue where the camp left off. In this regard, we would be able to incorporate more "real-life"
experiences and speech modification into the activities for those who attended the clinic. Just in the planning
stage-- hopefully, the university will support such ideas and make the benefit of camp extend past the first few
days. 

Ellen 

Stuttering Camp

From: Alyssa Cozzens
Date: 10/19/98
Time: 2:08:45 AM
Remote Name: 205.188.198.32

Comments

After reading this article, it made me really sad that I couldn't be part of it this summer. I heard my classmates
talk about their experience, but seeing tangible evidence made it sound even more appealing. I hope I get other
opportunities to participate in such wonderful events.


Fluency Camp Curriculum

From: Bette gray
Date: 10/19/98
Time: 8:38:13 PM
Remote Name: 152.163.201.73

Comments

Have you entertained the thought of compiling the various curriculums into a resource book for publication?
Hours went into the preparation and it would be well received. Many would like to mimic the camp but may
feel intimidated due to challenge of a curriculum.


Summer Camp

From: Veronica Chavarria
Date: 10/20/98
Time: 2:14:50 PM
Remote Name: 152.163.195.183

Comments

I think that this fluency camp is an excellent idea and I can't wait until I can participate in it! So many of my
fellow students have found such enthusiasm for fluency as well as their other studies. It is great for students
who have had their clinical practicums to be involved with these campers. Great work!


Camp for teenagers

From: Les Anderson
Date: 10/21/98
Time: 11:43:17 AM
Remote Name: 209.167.123.229

Comments

Ellen, 

There has been much talk and arguementive discussion about teenagers, in general, not being ready for clinical
therapy. In your experience with summer camps for stutterers, do you deal with teenagers at your camps? If
so, do they pose different problems than do preteenagers?


Re: Camp for teenagers

From: Ellen Bennett
Date: 10/23/98
Time: 1:08:00 PM
Remote Name: 129.108.2.198

Comments

Les, 

I do think that teenagers are a very different breed of people and their clinical experience should reflect this
difference. If a teen shows interest in attending camp, this tells me that they feel a need to be there and we
should not eliminate them from this opportunity. Now, if they are being coerced to attend by their parents or
therapist, this is a different matter. One year, we used the teens as camp facilitators, helping with the younger
children, Thend another year, they had their own group with their own curriculum. 

In any event, the teen needs to be an active participant in whatever activities their are involved in-- a
pre-decribed program may not meet their individual needs (or their need to be considered as independent
young adults). Certainly, an area that needs more forethought and planning that one would expect. Ellen 


Number of stuttering camps

From: Alan
Date: 10/22/98
Time: 1:17:36 PM
Remote Name: 152.163.205.48

Comments

I enjoyed reading your article about summer camps very much. Do you know how many camps of this kind
are in operation? Are there any lists of where and when these camps operate? I was also glad to see that you
were a fluency specialist for a school district. I am a graduate student interested in fluency disorders and I also
would like to know if students who are interested in this disorder are able to find work specific to fluency
disorders and where they may be employed. Are there many CF opportunities for students interested in
fluency? Thanks for any information that you can provide. 


Re: Number of stuttering camps

From: Ellen Bennett
Date: 10/23/98
Time: 1:18:06 PM
Remote Name: 129.108.2.198

Comments

Alan, 

There are several camps around the country but I don't know of any list that is available. Contact me directly
and I will pass on the names of those camps I am familiar with. 

As far as jobs specifically emphasizing fluency-- they are far and few between. In fact, some school districts
have eliminated their speciality position (Rochester Public Schools). It is a real disfortune to see this happen.
In YISD, we have had speciality positions for the past 15 +- years. The district is very progressive in this
regard because it provides support in many different areas (auditory processing, autism, early childhoon
intervention, fluency, voice and articulation, augmentative, etc.) By having someone on staff to help problem
solve difficult cases, the SLPs do not feel alone in handling their caseloads. There are frequent inservice
activities by these specialists and they have time allocated to come to your campus and assist you in testing and
treatment. Its a great concept which I fully support and wish was more prevasive in other school districts
across the country. 

Good luck in finding such a job. Ellen 



stuttering camps

From: Elizabeth Owens, East Carolina University
Date: 10/5/99
Time: 9:29:47 PM
Remote Name: 204.183.47.41

Comments

I have always wondered whether there were camps for children who stutter. I know that this type of
environment is so beneficial in helping a child feel a connection with other children who stutter and also to
help build self-confidence and a feeling of self-worth. I have a couple of questions about your camp. Have
you followed any of these children once they left the camp? You said that these children "were in a safe,
positive enfironment in which there were no expectations of fluency." Does the feelings they get from this
camp carry over int a not so safe and positive an environment? Also, what is "easy stuttering", and are
different types of methods used at this camp?