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Minnesota State University, Mankato
Minnesota State University, Mankato

2017-2018 Courses

Page address: http://www.mnsu.edu/honors/20172018courses.html

Fall 2017 Honors Courses

 

First Year Experience (FYEX 100) 1 Credit
Mondays, 3pm – 3:50pm, instructor: Dr. Anne Dahlman
Wednesdays, 10am-10:50am, instructor: Dr. Anne Dahlman
Wednesdays, 11am – 11:50am, instructor: Ginny Walters

Gen Ed 12

This course supports the development of student success skills, such as reading, writing, and speaking; helps students gain intellectual confidence; builds in the expectation of academic success; and provides assistance in making the transition to university life. The course provides an orientation to the mission and core competencies of the Honors Program, and strengthens the interaction and sense of community among first-year honors students. Students will analyze and categorize leadership, research, and global citizenship themes, identify appropriate learning goals, and develop an e-portfolio for their use in the Honors Program.

 

Art as Politics (ART 265W) 3 Credits, Alisa Eimen
Tuesdays & Thursdays, 11am – 12:15pm

Gen Ed 6, 8, Writing Intensive

This course focuses on the myriad ways in which art and politics intersect. Rather than emphasizing textbook learning, this course is organized around a series of thematic case studies that explore the overt, covert, and sometimes unintended political implications of a range of artworks from ancient times through today. Five themes structure the course and build on each other: (1) materials, form, and image; (2) representation and authority; (3) identity; (4) gender; and (5) museums. The course’s main objective is to enhance your critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. In addition, the course will bolster your knowledge of art and its history by emphasizing the various ways in which politics and art have, can, and continue to intersect and influence world cultures. Thus the content is global in scope, helping to bolster your competency as a global citizen, and course assignments will contribute to your role as a developing researcher.

 

Composition (ENG 101) 4 Credits, Heidi Burns

Wednesdays & Fridays, 8am - 9:45am

Gen Ed 1a

ENG101 supports the Honors research competency by teaching critical reading, writing, and research skills. The course emphasizes reading texts carefully, summarizing others’ ideas accurately, integrating material selectively, and communicating effectively. The course teaches students to adapt their language practices based on their audience, purpose and context, and it supplies them with a toolkit of transferrable writing strategies from which to select when faced with a rhetorical situation.

 

Developing Your Mentor Philosophy, (HONR 401) 1 Credit
Wednesdays, 1pm-1:50pm, Samantha Campa

This course will provide opportunities for in-depth investigation into leadership styles and methods, aiming to guide discovery and development of each student’s personal mentor philosophy. Students will apply their mentor philosophies throughout the semester by collaborating with and guiding new Honors students through various mentoring opportunities. Students participating in this course will be expected to work together to help create these mentoring opportunities, as well as be available and open to other students as mentors in the Honors Program. The goals of this course are to help students discover mentor qualities, to guide students to become more comfortable and confident with what it means to be a mentor, to utilize students’ strengths and weaknesses to build their individual mentor philosophy, to provide opportunities for students to practice their mentor philosophies, and to contribute to student portfolio development in leadership competencies.

 

 

Exploring Personal Leadership through Social Change (HONR 401) 3 Credits, Ginny Walters
Tuesdays & Thursdays, 2pm - 3:15pm

This course will introduce students to various perspectives on leadership through the lens of the social change model of leadership development. Students will explore and develop their personal understanding of leadership by engaging with a real-world issue of their choosing. Students will apply course readings, class discussions, and other assignments to the development of a change plan that focuses on an issue about which they are passionate, either on or off campus. Students will learn how to tap into their own strengths as leaders, how to appreciate the assets of a community, and the importance of developing key relationships to work toward lasting change in a community. This course can serve as a gateway into leadership experiences or as an enhancement of prior and current leadership experiences.

 

Honors Senior Portfolio (HONR 475) 1 Credit (online class), Dr. Anne Dahlman

This required course for seniors in the program allows the student to articulate where and how he or she has met the Honors Program Learning Outcomes.

 


 

Spring 2018 Honors Courses

 

Introduction to Honors (HONR 201) 1 Credit, Dr. Dahlman

Thursdays, 9am - 9:50am

This course is required for students who transfer into the Honors program or who join without taking the FYEX course. This course provides an orientation to the mission and core competencies of the Honors Program. Students will analyze and categorize leadership, research, and global citizenship themes, identify appropriate learning goals, and develop an e-portfolio for their use in the Honors Program.

 

Philosophical Problem: The Mind-Body Problem (PHIL101W) 3 credits, Dr. Richard Liebendorfer
Mondays, Wednesdays & Fridays, 10am - 11am
Gen Ed 6, Writing Intensive

 Philosophy 101W, The Mind-Body Problem, explores answers to questions such as what is a mind, what are particular states of mind, and do those questions have answers in science, religion, philosophy or only in our ordinary talk of one another as acting on desires and beliefs. Along the way we will discuss issues of science, religion, and philosophy, differences between humans and other animals, as well as the currently widely held view that the mind is just ‘software’ encoded in ‘hardware’, perhaps a robot’s hardware. The last is an idea richly explored in science fiction.

 

Social Change in the 21st Century: Social Movements, Social Justice, and Collective Action (HONR 401) 3 Credits, Dr. Carol Glasser
Mondays, 5pm - 7:45pm

This seminar explores the main forms of generating social change in the United States, with a focus on social movements and social justice campaigns of the 21st century. The seminar has two key components—learning and action. This course is arranged by key social movement theories and concepts. In each section investigation into theories and concepts will occur through readings and case studies of social movements, campaigns, and leaders. A deeper understanding of the process of social justice and social change will be developed through the application of course concepts as students work in groups to choose a social justice topic of interest, research its root causes, examine how it is impacting the Manakto or MSU community, and develop an advocacy strategy to help address this issue.

 

Developing Your Mentor Philosophy, (HONR 401) 1 Credit
Wednesdays, 1pm-1:50pm, Samantha Campa

This course will provide opportunities for in-depth investigation into leadership styles and methods, aiming to guide discovery and development of each student’s personal mentor philosophy. Students will apply their mentor philosophies throughout the semester by collaborating with and guiding new Honors students through various mentoring opportunities. Students participating in this course will be expected to work together to help create these mentoring opportunities, as well as be available and open to other students as mentors in the Honors Program. The goals of this course are to help students discover mentor qualities, to guide students to become more comfortable and confident with what it means to be a mentor, to utilize students’ strengths and weaknesses to build their individual mentor philosophy, to provide opportunities for students to practice their mentor philosophies, and to contribute to student portfolio development in leadership competencies.

 

Writing Home (HONR 401) 3 Credits, Martin Mitchell and Kellian Clink
Tuesdays & Thursdays, 3:45pm - 5 pm, AH 223a

This class aims to have students explore their sense of place, defined in Oxford's dictionary of Geography as, "Either the intrinsic character of a place, or the meaning people give to it, but, more often, a mixture of both". Sense of place ...is an umbrella concept that includes all the other concepts -- attachment to place, national identity, and regional awareness...(Mayhew,n.d.) Students will explore the landscape of their choice, including its physical structure and subsequent cultural imprints. Successive assignments lead students through describing the physical essence place and how its topography, geology, climate, and biological resources shaped its history and settlement by various people groups and operating within their cultural paradigms.

 

Honors Senior Portfolio (HONR 475) 1 Credit (online class), Dr. Anne Dahlman

This required course for seniors in the program allows the student to articulate where and how he or she has met the Honors Program Learning Outcomes.