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Minnesota State University, Mankato

Minnesota State University, Mankato
Honors

2015-2016 Courses

Page address: http://www.mnsu.edu/honors/courses15.html

Fall 2015

First Year Experience (FYEX 100) 1 Credit
Mondays at 3 p.m., 4 p.m. or 6 p.m.,

Gen Ed 12

This course supports the development of student success skills, such as reading, writing, and speaking; helps students gain intellectual confidence; builds in the expectation of academic success; and provides assistance in making the transition to university life. The course provides an orientation to the mission and core competencies of the Honors Program, and strengthens the interaction and sense of community among first-year honors students. Students will analyze and categorize leadership, research, and global citizenship themes, identify appropriate learning goals, and develop an e-portfolio for their use in the Honors Program.

 

Composition (ENG 101) 4 Credits,

Gen Ed 1a

ENG101 supports the Honors research competency by teaching critical reading, writing, and research skills. The course emphasizes reading texts carefully, summarizing others’ ideas accurately, integrating material selectively, and communicating effectively. The course teaches students to adapt their language practices based on their audience, purpose and context, and it supplies them with a toolkit of transferrable writing strategies from which to select when faced with a rhetorical situation.

 

European History to 1648 (HIST 180) 4 credits, Chris Corley

Gen Ed 5, 9

This course examines European history from the ancient and classical periods to 1648, the end of the Thirty Years' War. The course is designed to kindle your interest in the past by revealing worlds and peoples whose accomplishments and activities, for better or worse, have deeply impacted our world today. This honors section will abandon the traditional textbook-style approach in favor of deep analysis of primary sources (documents from the time period) and by experimenting with simulations of past situations in the period under study. In the simulations, students will study the period and its events, people and ideas; engage contemporary conflicts; and make decisions that place them at the center of sweeping changes in European history.

Human Relations in a Multicultural Society (KSP 220W) 3 Credits,

Gen Ed 7, 11,

Students will be exposed to many aspects of human relations in a multicultural society. This course prepares students to critcally examine the social and cultural foundations of inequality in the society through the lens of public education. This main purpose of this course is the study and application of positive relationships in diverse communities in school and the larger community, through in-class explorations as well as service learning work in schools and/or the community. The course places a strong emphasis on community building as we have students from various colleges and majors attending the course.

 

Research and Information Literacy (HONR 401) 1 Credit, Justine Martin

To thrive in today’s information rich society, students need information literacy, or the ability to recognize an information need and to locate, evaluate, and effectively use needed information. By the end of this course, students will exhibit how to effectively find, evaluate, and synthesize information for academic research. Students will explore a variety of information tools, resources, and ethical dilemmas as they enter the community of scholars. The work produced in this course will help students prepare for undergraduate research projects.

 

Developing Your Mentor Philosophy, (HONR 401) 1 Credit

This course will provide opportunities for in-depth investigation into leadership styles and methods, aiming to guide discovery and development of each student’s personal mentor philosophy. Students will apply their mentor philosophies throughout the semester by collaborating with and guiding new Honors students through various mentoring opportunities. Students participating in this course will be expected to work together to help create these mentoring opportunities, as well as be available and open to other students as mentors in the Honors Program. The goals of this course are to help students discover mentor qualities, to guide students to become more comfortable and confident with what it means to be a mentor, to utilize students’ strengths and weaknesses to build their individual mentor philosophy, to provide opportunities for students to practice their mentor philosophies, and to contribute to student portfolio development in leadership competencies

 

Honors Senior Portfolio (HONR 475) 1 Credit

This required course for seniors in the program allows the student to articulate where and how he or she has met the Honors Program Learning Outcomes.

 


 

Spring 2016

Psychology Today (PSYC 103W) 3 Credits, Rosemary Krawczyk

Gen Ed 1C

This course will introduce students to psychological issues in society that affect their lives, behaviors, and the way they think. Students will be required to critically address current issues through intensive writing, research, discussion, and presentations.

 

Worlds of Dance (DANC 225W) 3 credits, Julie Kerr-Berry

Gen Ed 8

This course explores many dance forms from around the world.  From an interdisciplinary approach, its primary focus is to broaden student’s perspective and understanding of dance.  The course is founded on the premise that dance is an embodiment of culture, while universal in expression it is specific in form.

 

Developing Your Mentor Philosophy, (HONR 401) 1 Credit

This course will provide opportunities for in-depth investigation into leadership styles and methods, aiming to guide discovery and development of each student’s personal mentor philosophy. Students will apply their mentor philosophies throughout the semester by collaborating with and guiding new Honors students through various mentoring opportunities. Students participating in this course will be expected to work together to help create these mentoring opportunities, as well as be available and open to other students as mentors in the Honors Program. The goals of this course are to help students discover mentor qualities, to guide students to become more comfortable and confident with what it means to be a mentor, to utilize students’ strengths and weaknesses to build their individual mentor philosophy, to provide opportunities for students to practice their mentor philosophies, and to contribute to student portfolio development in leadership competencies

 

Writing Home (HONR 401), 4 credits, Martin Mitchell and Kellian Clink

Students will explore home. Sense of Place is defined in Oxford's Dictionary of Geography as:

Either the intrinsic character of a place, or the meaning people give to it, but, more often, a mixture of both. Sense of place...is an umbrella concept that includes all the other concepts - attachement to place, national identity, and regional awareness...(Mayhew, n.d.)

Students will research a particular place they consider home and learn about its physical structure and subsequent cultural imprints. Successive assignments lead students through describing the physcial essence of place and how the topography and geology, climate and bilogical resources shaped its history through settlement by various people groups operating within their own cultural paradigms. Contributing to the deeper understanding of critical issues, discussions will lead to understanding the different elements critical to defining a sense of place.

 

Introduction to Honors (HONR 201) 1 Credit
Monday 3pm - 3:50pm, 
Monday 4pm - 4:50pm, 

This course is required for students who transfer into the Honors program or who join without taking the FYEX course. This course provides an orientation to the mission and core competencies of the Honors Program. Students will analyze and categorize leadership, research, and global citizenship themes, identify appropriate learning goals, and develop an e-portfolio for their use in the Honors Program.

 

Honors Service-Learning (HONR 450), Ginny Walters


Students will be introduced to various principles of service learning, which they will apply during a short-term service abroad immersion experience. Prior to the immersion experience, students will prepare for and orient themselves to the experience through exploration of culture and personal and group reflections. During the immersion experience, students will engage in the reality of the community setting and reflect throughout the process. After the immersion experience, students will engage in critical personal reflection and class dialogue in order to synthesize components of the experience and apply them to their personal and/or professional growth.

Honors Senior Portfolio (HONR 475) 1 Credit, 

This required course for seniors in the program allows the student to articulate where and how he or she has met the Honors Program Learning Outcomes.