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Minnesota State University, Mankato

Minnesota State University, Mankato
Honors

2014-2015 Courses

Page address: http://www.mnsu.edu/honors/currentstudents/courses14html.html

Fall 2014

First Year Experience (FYEX 100) 1 Credit, Dr. Corley
Mondays at 3 p.m., 4 p.m. or 6 p.m.

Gen Ed 12

This course supports the development of student success skills, such as reading, writing, and speaking; helps students gain intellectual confidence; builds in the expectation of academic success; and provides assistance in making the transition to university life. The course provides an orientation to the mission and core competencies of the Honors Program, and strengthens the interaction and sense of community among first-year honors students. Students will analyze and categorize leadership, research, and global citizenship themes, identify appropriate learning goals, and develop an e-portfolio for their use in the Honors Program.

 

Public Speaking (CMST 102), 3 credits, Dr. Engen
Mondays and Wednesdays, 3 p.m. - 4:45 p.m., AH 219

 Gen Ed 1B

This is an introductory course in the theory and practice of public speaking. The skills you will develop in this course include analyzing the speaking situation, choosing appropriate topics, conducting research, organizing ideas, utilizing evidence, delivering speeches effectively, and the ability to listen critically. The main purpose of this course is to help you develop your oral communication abilities and as such you should not expect a great deal of time will be spent in lecture or discussion of the reading assignments. Instead, time will be spent applying the content of the course readings to the practice of public speaking.

In addition to gaining skills as a speaker, this course will help you develop more general skills such as critical analysis, drafting, peer evaluation, and revision. We will learn about these things by taking seriously the task of joining a public conversation and becoming a responsible public advocate. We will work together to create a classroom that is inclusive of and respectful to everyone and his or her ideas. We will also work together to create an environment where public speaking becomes the presentation of informed and thoughtful ideas by citizen-students.

All major assignments in this course will link to the common theme of poverty in Greater Mankato and Minnesota. Students will develop a sense of civic engagement and public speaking abilities through their analysis of this issue.

 

Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 101), 4 credits, Dr. Lassonde
Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:00 p.m. - 3:50 p.m., AH 39

Gen Ed 5

This course provides a broad overview of the concepts and themes involved in the field of psychology, the scientific study of behavior. In this course we will explore the science of psychology by examining theoretical aspects and then applying them in class discussions, assignments/exams, and everyday situations. Together we will examine the following broad topics in psychology: origins of psychology, basic research methods, neuroscience and behavior, nature and nurture of behavior, development, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning,memory and cognition, thinking and intelligence, language, personality, psychological disorders, and social psychology.

The honors section of this course allows a rich examination of the strengths and weaknesses of the field by exploring misconceptions of psychological knowledge (knowledge that is untrue but believed to be true by many). Psychology misconceptions often have become general rules of thumb to describe human behavior. This false information is damaging to the field of psychology as the general public often has large gaps in their understanding of what psychologists do.

 

United States Government (POLS 111), 3 credits, Dr. Kunkel
Tuesdays and Thursdays 11 am – 12:15 pm, AH 215

Gen Ed 5 and 9

 What better time is there to study U.S. Government than during the critical 2014 midterm elections? What better way to learn than by doing? Your foundation learning will include basic political science information on historic and present U.S. government and politics. We will consider political ideas and the Constitution, citizen activism through elections and parties and the branches of government. Building on this foundation, students will practice and observe leadership and citizenship. Students will either volunteer on a political campaign or work with others to form a student group to participate in the election in some way. We will also be hungry news consumers, keeping abreast of the latest news about the 2014 elections in Minnesota and nationally. Using writing and class sessions we should generate some lively and insightful discussions. The free and civil exchange of ideas and opinions will be encouraged.

 

American Indian Leaders (HONR 401), 3 credits, Dr. Dass
Wednesday, 6 p.m. - 8:45 p.m., TN 363

During our time together we will examine what is meant by the term "leadership." We will look at historic leadership among American Indians prior to European colonization, the overlap of Indian and colonial leadership, contemporary governmental leadership, and contemporary tribal leadership. As we define what leadership is and is not, we will examine the characteristics of individuals who may deserve the title of leader among American Indian communities.

Depending on student curriculum needs, this course may also be taken as AIS 300W, and contracted for honors credit.

 

Performance and Social Change (HONR 401), 4 credits, Dr. White
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9 a.m. - 10:45 a.m., PA 102

This class is designed to teach students to identify instances of injustice and promote social change through theoretical analysis and performance techniques. The course includes discussion of theories of oppression, power and privilege, specifically as they appear in the social categories of race, class, and gender. Students study the theory and techniques associated with Augusto Boal's Theatre of the Oppressed Methods. The course is designed to build toward a final performance project in which students develop and perform a forum theatre production confronting an injustice they have identified as present in the Mankato community. The performance will be presented in the community and open to the public.

 

Developing Your Mentor Philosophy, (HONR 401) 1 credit, Dr. Corley
Tuesdays, 4pm - 4:50pm, AH 302

This course will provide opportunities for in-depth investigation into leadership styles and methods, aiming to guide discovery and development of each student’s personal mentor philosophy. Students will apply their mentor philosophies throughout the semester by collaborating with and guiding new Honors students through various mentoring opportunities. Students participating in this course will be expected to work together to help create these mentoring opportunities, as well as be available and open to other students as mentors in the Honors Program. The goals of this course are to help students discover mentor qualities, to guide students to become more comfortable and confident with what it means to be a mentor, to utilize students’ strengths and weaknesses to build their individual mentor philosophy, to provide opportunities for students to practice their mentor philosophies, and to contribute to student portfolio development in leadership competencies

 

Honors Senior Portfolio (HONR 475) 1 Credit, Dr. Corley

This required course for seniors in the program allows the student to articulate where and how he or she has met the Honors Program Learning Outcomes.

 


 

Spring 2015

Introduction to Honors (HONR 201) 1 Credit

Monday 3pm - 3:50pm, Ginny Walters
Monday 4pm - 4:50pm, Dr. Corley

This course is required for students who transfer into the Honors program or who join without taking the FYEX course. This course provides an orientation to the mission and core competencies of the Honors Program. Students will analyze and categorize leadership, research, and global citizenship themes, identify appropriate learning goals, and develop an e-portfolio for their use in the Honors Program.

 

Art History Survey I (ART 260), 3 credits, Dr. Eimen
Mondays and Wednesdays 2pm - 3:15pm

Gen Ed 6 and 8

We will travel around the globe as we study works as diverse as ancient cave paintings, Egyptian pyramids, Roman statuary, and temple, mosque, and cathedral architecture. The material--covering a span from the Paleolithic era through the fourteenth century--is simply too vast to be comprehensive, so this course is designed to introduce you to key masterpieces, monuments, and moments in the history of human civilization. These introductions will be framed by two principal themes: the expression of authority and the role of tradition. In addition, some specialized vocabulary and discipline-specific methods of study are included as an introduction to the academic discipline of art history. Our main emphasis will be to consider artistic development as we seek to understand the past through its archaeological and art historical record. No previous knowledge of art history is necessary to succeed in this course.

 

Introduction to Ethics (PHIL 120W), 3 credits, Dr. Cooke
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:00am-12:15am, AH 214

Gen Ed 1C, 6, and 9

Ethical thought gets started with two simple, but vital, questions: What must I do? How should I live? This course investigates the efforts of philosophers to provide compelling answers to these questions and others. Interpersonal and intercultural disagreements about ethical values lead many people to conclude that ethics is nothing more than personal opinion, or nothing more than self-justified cultural norms. We will see that both of these views should be rejected—and in part for surprising reasons related to the importance of toleration and mutual understanding. The heart of the course looks at the three main ethical theories in the Western tradition: consequentialism, which claims that the right action is the one that produces the best results; Kantian ethics, which claims that our basic moral duty is to respect the dignity of rational beings; and virtue ethics, which argues that living the best sort of life possible requires cultivating the right sort of character. We will make use of these theories to examine a number of issues, including the ethical responsibilities of affluent nations to the developing world, the ethical character of leaders, and the distinction between cultural practices and trans-cultural ethical values. As this is a writing intensive course, students will write 3 short papers on assigned topics, and one long paper on a topic of their choice.

 

 Becoming Global Citizens (HONR 401), 1 credit, Caryn Lindsay
Every other Wednesday, 4pm - 6pm

“Global citizenship” and “intercultural competency” are aspirations – goals that we can set for ourselves, learn about and work toward – but which take a lifetime of experiences, learning and effort to hopefully, one day, accomplish. In this course, each participant, including the instructor, will reflect upon the meanings of these concepts and work on developing personal definitions and development plans that they can return to and refine in the future.

 

Witchcraft, Gender and Society in Preindustrial Europe (HONR 401), 3 credits, Dr. Corley
Monday, 6pm - 8:50pm

At different times and places in history, some people have been labeled and marked as threats to their society. They have been accused and tried as criminals, suffered social isolation and shunning, and in some cases endured persecutions and even death. The European witch hunts in the later Middle Ages and Renaissance/Reformation eras provide one extraordinary example of this disturbing phenomenon in human history. This seminar will examine the changing features of European culture and society that allowed the witch hunts to develop. Students will study the broader historical context, paying particular attention to gender and sexuality, economic and social life, philosophy and theology, and politics and the law.

 

Exploring Leadership in the Context of Conference Development (HONR 401) 3 Credits, Ginny Walters
Wednesday, 6pm - 8:50pm

This course will introduce students to various perspectives on leadership and assist students in developing their authentic leadership style. Students will partake in readings, class discussions, and assignments that require an analytical approach to leadership. The course will cover topics such as values-based leadership, cross-cultural contexts, emotional intelligence, and gender and reacial equity as they relate to leadership. Students will relate course content to their personal development as a leader and apply course content by developing and planning the Upper Midwest Regional Honors Conference (UMRHC), which will be hosted at MSU, Mankato in Spring 2015. Students should plan to be available the entire weekend of March 26 – 28, which are the dates of the conference.

 

Developing Your Mentor Philosophy, (HONR 401) 1 credit, 
Tuesdays, 4pm - 4:50pm

This course will provide opportunities for in-depth investigation into leadership styles and methods, aiming to guide discovery and development of each student’s personal mentor philosophy. Students will apply their mentor philosophies throughout the semester by collaborating with and guiding new Honors students through various mentoring opportunities. Students participating in this course will be expected to work together to help create these mentoring opportunities, as well as be available and open to other students as mentors in the Honors Program. The goals of this course are to help students discover mentor qualities, to guide students to become more comfortable and confident with what it means to be a mentor, to utilize students’ strengths and weaknesses to build their individual mentor philosophy, to provide opportunities for students to practice their mentor philosophies, and to contribute to student portfolio development in leadership competencies

Honors Senior Portfolio (HONR 475) 1 Credit, Dr. Corley

This required course for seniors in the program allows the student to articulate where and how he or she has met the Honors Program Learning Outcomes.