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Minnesota State University, Mankato
Minnesota State University, Mankato

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Page address: http://www.mnsu.edu/news/read/?paper=topstories&id=old-1160495934

University's CETL Chosen for Carnegie Foundation Program

Minnesota State University’s Center for Excellence in Teaching & Learning has been selected to take part in a Carnegie Foundation program designed to explore and implement innovative teaching methods in colleges and universities

2006-10-10

What began as a small program to get Minnesota State University, Mankato instructors talking with each other about ways to enhance their teaching is now aligned with a Carnegie Foundation program to foster innovative teaching worldwide.

Minnesota State University's Center for Excellence in Teaching & Learning has been selected to take part in a Carnegie Foundation program designed to explore and implement innovative teaching methods in colleges and universities. The Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (CASTL) will convene for the first time Nov. 8 in Washington, D.C. with representatives from Minnesota State University joining those from 86 other selected colleges and universities around the world.

Now in its fifth year on campus, The Center for Excellence in Teaching & Learning has served as a resource and meeting ground for Minnesota State Mankato instructors eager to learn from their peers and improve their own teaching methods. The Center is voluntary and encourages faculty to share ideas and experiences with fellow instructors in other departments. Many who have gone through the program have implemented significant changes in the way they approach teaching.

"What it's all about is student learning," said the Center's director, Stewart Ross. "Teaching is not a static thing - there are new ideas and changes. We're excited to be part of a national version of what we've been doing on campus for the past several years."

The CETL began shortly after President Richard Davenport arrived on campus in 2002. From the start, Davenport said, he and his administration have been in full support of the Center's activities.

"When students are your top priority, you must continually explore the best possible ways to teach," Davenport said. "The CETL is a successful testament to the University's priority of challenge and innovation in the classroom." Selection to take part in the Carnegie program, which lasts three years, is evidence of the Center's role as a model program, Davenport said.

In a separate development, the Center's Excellence Certificate Program was recently named one of six finalists for the 2006 Innovative Idea Award from the national Professional and Organizational Development in Higher Education Network. The award will be presented at an Oct. 25 conference in Portland, Ore.

 

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