Psychology

Graduate Programs

Description

Clinical Psychology MA is a full-time, two-year research-oriented course of study which provides theoretical and applied training to students who wish to pursue doctoral study. Graduates typically pursue the doctorate in professional psychology. 

Industrial-Organizational Psychology MA is a full-time, two-year course of study. Our focus is a scientist-practitioner model that prepares students for careers in human resources, organizational effectiveness, management and I-O psychology consulting or for doctoral level study in industrial-organizational psychology or related fields. Graduates typically pursue careers in applied professions. 

School Psychology Psy.D. is a full-time, five-year research-oriented course of study. The program trains students to attain certification to practice as school psychologists and/or pursue other doctoral level employment such as university teaching. The program is designed to meet the doctoral-level accreditation standards of the National Association of School Psychologists. Some students who have completed master’s or specialist’s training are admitted with advanced standing. The program is housed in the psychology department and emphasizes (a) data-based decision making, (b) multiculturalism, (c) mental health, and (d) prevention. 

 

Majors

Program Locations Major / Total Credits
Clinical Psychology MA MA - Master of Arts
  • Mankato
50 / 50
Industrial Organizational Psychology MA MA - Master of Arts
  • Mankato
44 / 44
School Psychology MS MS - Master of Science
  • Mankato
34 / 34
School Psychology PSYD PSYD - Doctor of Psychology
  • Mankato
106 / 106

Certificates

Program Locations Major / Total Credits
General Psychology GC
  • Mankato
  • Online
18 / 18

Policies & Faculty

Policies

Clinical Psychology 

Admission

In addition to completing the general admission requirements for the College of Graduate Studies and Research, the following must be completed:

  1. A bachelor's degree in psychology from an accredited institution. Coursework must include statistics.
  2. Applicants who have a bachelor's degree other than psychology, from an accredited institution and have completed courses in statistics, experimental psychology, personality, abnormal psychology, conditioning, learning or behavior modification, developmental psychology (child, adolescent, or aging) and a course in history and systems of psychology can be considered for admission.
  3. Students with undergraduate course deficiencies may be considered, however, they must complete deficiencies prior to enrolling in advanced coursework.
  4. The GRE is required (see department for specific requirements).
  5. Three letters of recommendation, preferably from psychology professors.
  6. A personal statement including the applicant's interest in clinical psychology and long term career goals.

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Industrial-Organizational Psychology MA

(Thesis Plan – 44 credits)
(Internship Plan – 44 credits)

Contact Information

103 Armstrong Hall

(507) 389-2724
https://sbs.mnsu.edu/academics/psychology/

Faculty

500 Level

Credits: 4

Examination of the historical origins of the principal contemporary psychological theories.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This course provides a broad overview and analysis of the major theories of human and animal learning.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This course covers experimental and behavioral studies of human memory including long and short-term memory, memory for text, pictures, spatial information, and autobiographical events. Emphasis on real-world situations, including education, in which memory and learning play a role.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

An examination and evaluation of selected topics dealing with human information processing such as attention, memory, pattern recognition, consciousness, language, dyslexia, decision making, and problem-solving.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Biological foundations of the actions of psychoactive drugs. Neuroanatomy structure and function, neurophysiology, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics will be covered in detail. Relevant classes of drugs will be highlighted with an eye toward their history, mechanisms of action, effects, and treatments.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Biological basis of psychological processes and behavior. Neuroanatomy, neural function, and laboratory methods of investigation will be explored in relation to topics such as sleep, memory, language, intelligence and psychological disorders.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

The goal of neuroscience is to understand the human mind. This goal is approached by revealing the brain processes involved in how we perceive, think, remember, and move. Brain development, communication, and plasticity at the neural level are all described.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Physical, social, emotional, intellectual, and personality development from conception to preadolescence. Focus on interplay between maturation and experience.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This class covers the development of the individual from the age of 11 to 19 years of age. Discussion will include aspects of both normal and abnormal development.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Exploring factors affecting leadership and effective group processes through lectures and discussions of theories and findings and through experiential activities.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

An in-depth examination of social psychological research in laboratory and field settings.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Advanced Cognitive Psychology introduces students to key research papers in the field of human cognition. Through reading, writing, and the study of experimental design, students will advance their understanding of cognitive psychology and develop their ability to critically review and evaluate research.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This course is designed to increase the student's awareness and understanding of abnormal psychology. Students will become familiar with clinical descriptions, course of onset, and treatment regimens specific to various disorders.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Psychological study of women in historical and functional perspective. Role of hereditary, physiological, and socialization variables on women's thinking, feelings and behavior.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Analysis of product marketing and consumer purchasing strategies and their determinants.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

The interface of behavioral and medical science is explored. Research on environmental and learning factors in the etiology and treatment of physical disease and rehabilitation is examined. Specific topics include pain management, medical compliance, behavior disorders in nursing homes, and chronic illnesses. Prerequisite: Three courses in PSYC V

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

On-site field experience teaching within the discipline of Psychology at the secondary or post-secondary level. Teaching placement is in place and arranged by the student before enrolling in this course.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

Specific topics depend on the instructor; all will focus on applications of psychology in current contexts and/or issues. May be retaken for credit.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-3

Topics to be announced. May be retaken for credit. V

Prerequisites: none

600 Level

Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to provide a broad overview to the discipline of psychology, covering a range of content areas, including neuroscience, development, cognition, social behavior, and abnormal psychology. The course will emphasize understanding relevant theories in psychology via application and analysis of ideas, and engagement with current research in the field.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Major concepts of human motivation and emotion, presentation of learned cognitive and biological influences on sustained behavior.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

Enrollment limited to students in good standing in the industrial/organizational track.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Research methodology and statistical procedures involving descriptive and inferential techniques for simple and multivariate situations involving parametric and non parametric variables using manual and computer methods.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Covers methods for analyzing treatments and experimental (as well as quasi-experimental) manipulations that focus on the behavior of the individual subject, multiple N=1, and small group designs.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Overview of multivariate statistical analyses including: multiple regression, ANCOVA, MANOVA, discriminate function analysis, and factor analysis.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

An overview of development, use, and validation of psychological tests and questionnaires. Topics include reliability, validity, test construction, test administration, and ethics. In addition, advanced topics and analytical methods for testing will be discussed including meta-analysis and item response theory. Finally, the course will cover in-depth discussion of statistical methods of assessing bias in testing. An emphasis will be placed on developing hands-on experience with test construction, data analysis and interpretation of test data.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

Topics in contemporary psychology. Each instructor selects topic. Sixteen contact hours in seminar format. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Topics in contemporary psychology. Each instructor selects topic. Thirty-two contact hours in seminar format. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Topics in contemporary psychology. Each instructor selects topic. Forty-eight contact hours in seminar format. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Topics in contemporary psychology. Each instructor selects topic. Sixty-four contact hours in seminar format. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

An overview of techniques used to measure employee performance. Topics include: Job analysis methods and use of results, criterion development, performance appraisal methods, rater training, bias and accuracy in performance appraisal, organizational and contextual issues.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Graduate students gain knowledge and experience in conducting psychoeducational assessments of adults, including structured interview and cognitive ability and academic achievement tests.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Exploring factors affecting leadership and effective group processes through lectures and discussion of theories and findings and through experiential activities.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

This seminar will cover professional topics in Industrial-Organizational Psychology. Students will integrate scientific principles to practical applications in the workplace.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

An overview of the diagnostic criteria and procedures of adult mental disorders using the DSM classification system. Controversies and ethics relating to the utilization of the DSM are emphasized.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Overview of issues and techniques used to make hiring and promotion decisions in organizations. Topic includes: introduction of the selection process, legal and affirmative action issues, validity issues in selection, validity generalization, utility and decision making, and use of selection methods.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

This course will examine the changing demographics of the American workforce, including the role of globalization. Topics will include how various types of diversity impact workplace staffing, performance management, training, culture/climate, well-being, and teamwork. In particular, the course will focus on how organizations can better manage a diverse workforce and implement changes that move towards inclusivity.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

An overview of theories and techniques used to increase employee satisfaction, improve employee productivity, and increase organizational effectiveness. Topics include: diagnosing organizational problems, designing interventions, implementing interventions, and institutionalizing change.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

This course will provide an overview of common field methodologies in I-O psychology field work. Topics covered will include surveys, experiments, and quasi-experiments, as well as practical applications such as data cleaning and management.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of the theories and applied practice of therapy for sexuality-related concerns. A focus is placed on the biopsychosocial assessment and interventions for desire, arousal, orgasmic, and pain disorders. Cultural competency within the context of sexuality is emphasized.

Prerequisites: Admission into the Clinical Psychology, Social Work, or Mental Health Counseling graduate programs.

Credits: 4

This course is an advanced overview of applied behavior analysis and it application to real world settings for graduate students. The class also will acquaint students with different strategies that may be used to assess and change behavior, as well as the variety of settings in which behavioral principles and techniques may be applied to improve the lives of individuals. Students will be required to conduct a functional behavior assessment, design a treatment plan, and monitor progress by the end of the semester.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

Individualized learning under faculty supervision. May be retaken for credit.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This course will provide an in-depth view to the philosophy of behavioral science, which will include the understanding and history of the core concepts in radical behaviorism and its relation to other fields in psychology. This course will also provide further analysis in the basic principles identified in the experimental analysis of behavior, B.F. Skinner¿s view on verbal behavior, derived relational responding, and provide an introduction into contextual behavioral science. The application of these behavioral concepts and principles have on society will be also discussed.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

This course involves the preparation of a professional portfolio showing the connection of current work related to psychology to content, theories, and / or ideas within the discipline.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This course is designed to be an overview of empirically-supported interventions for common behavioral problems of childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. The course will focus on behaviorally and cognitive-behaviorally oriented intervention techniques.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This course trains students in the diagnosis of child psychological disorders using DSM classification procedures. Case conceptualization from a developmental psychopathology perspective is emphasized.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

The primary purpose of this graduate course is to introduce the principles and techniques of assessment and case formulation utilized by behaviorally oriented clinical psychologists. The course focuses on behavioral assessment and case formulation as a process of identifying specific behaviors of concern, developing a treatment plan, and evaluating treatment outcomes.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

This course provides fieldwork experiences in applied behavior analysis in a clinical setting and meets the requirements for the Board Certified Behavior Analyst exam. Students will meet with the BCBA-D instructor weekly to discuss cases and fieldwork experience. Restricted to students in the Clinical Psychology MA program.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

A comprehensive assessment course including multiple tests of adaptive behaviors, behavior management measures, personality, and psychopathology. The end goal of the course is competence in administering complete batteries of psychological tests and writing professional reports on the results.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Details the principles and standards put forth by the APA to guide the profession of psychology. The course is oriented towards those going into either a career in therapy (i.e., clinical, counseling, or school psychology), research or teaching.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Students are placed in clinical settings under the supervision of a licensed psychologist. Placements vary among hospitals, private clinics, and county mental health agencies. Clinical Practicum I covers the first 150 clock hours of the 300 hours needed to fulfill the practicum requirement.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Extension of Practicum I. Students complete the second 150 hours of the 300 hours of supervised practice.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Continuation of Research in Clinical Psychology II. Emphasis is placed on further developing research and scholarly skills by engaging in additional research activities and assuming a more active and independent roll in developing and conducting research under the supervision of a faculty advisor.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-3

Individualized student paper based on an extensive review of literature in some area of psychology.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Students participate on laboratory teams with clinical faculty. Emphasis is placed on developing a variety of research and scholarly skills related to clinical psychology. Students are expected to begin assisting faculty with ongoing research and develop a greater understanding of applied research methods and skills.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Continuation of Research in Clinical Psychology I. Emphasis is placed on continuing to develop advanced research and scholarly skills by engaging in a wider variety of research activities and by beginning to develop independent research projects.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3-6

Individualized student research paper which involves a literature review and original research.

Prerequisites: none

700 Level

Credits: 4

This course will introduce school psychology doctoral students to the wide range of professional issues relevant to school psychology and provide a context for their training at Minnesota State Mankato.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

This is a field-based course that introduces school psychology students to the K-12 school context via in-school observations and brief clinical experiences. Students complete 45 hours of field experience.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This course focuses on the role that standardized tests and measures play in educational decision-making. Students also learn how to evaluate the psychometric quality of tests.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

The basic skills required to professionally administer intelligence tests are covered. Students develop initial fluency in the administration of at least two tests and are exposed to several others.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Students focus on learning a data-based approach to problem solving academic problems for individual children. Focus is on assessment leading to intervention.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Topics include models of consultation, the development of school and parent consultation skills, and providing educational and mental health services across all levels of prevention.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This class will be a comprehensive overview of the cultural, socioeconomic, and ethnic competencies needed by school psychologists entering today's diverse educational setting. Students will learn about services that respond to culture and context to facilitate family and school collaborations.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Students focus on understanding how school systems function, how to be a leader in system-change efforts and how to supervise and support the continued professional learning of individuals and groups in school settings.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This is the first half of a year-long practicum placement in which students engage in a wide variety of professional school psychology practices under the supervision of a licensed practicing school psychologist. Students complete 160 hours of field experience.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This is a continuation of PSYC 750. Students complete an additional 160 hours of field experience in school psychology.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Doctoral students engage in supervised clinical experiences in a placement that will further their preferred areas of professional expertise related to school psychology. Students complete 80 hours of field experience.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

This is a continuation of PSYC 760. Students complete an additional 80 hours of field experience in school psychology.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

The course will provide a high-quality multicultural experience for advanced doctoral students interested in broadening their understanding of educational practices at the international level. Students will have the opportunity to impact students in poor regions in need of their attention.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This class will focus on the application of hypothesis testing processes and a range of procedures to understand child abnormal behavior and formulate interventions. Topics include assessment procedures and application of these procedures to specific categories of psychopathology.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This class focuses on the development and implementation of specific psychological interventions in school settings following the assessment and diagnosis of specific mental health problems.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Pediatric Neuropsychology will focus on diagnostics, referrals and common neurological problems encountered by School Psychologists in field or hospital settings. It is designed to train skills used in recognizing, assessing, and treating complex neurological disorders commonly seen in school-aged populations.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

An independent study format used for topic expansion or offerings curtailed due to staffing constraints. Arrangements are to be made with each instructor regarding the materials, readings, assignments, and paper topics.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Doctoral students participate in research teams, gain experience in data collection, develop research ideas, and write research and IRB proposals.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2-4

This course covers areas of contemporary relevance to the discipline of School Psychology in a seminar format allowing for maximum coverage of the specific topic.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2-8

This 1500-hour internship is a culminating experience for the school psychology Psy.D. program. Students are placed at a site where they engage in a wide range of school psychology services under the supervision of a doctoral-level school or licensed psychologist.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-8

The dissertation is based on independent research conducted by doctoral candidates at or near the end of their course of study. The dissertation culminates in an oral defense.

Prerequisites: none