Agribusiness and Food Innovation (BS)

Summary

The AgriBusiness & Food Innovation major prepares students to be the leaders of tomorrow by developing agriculture and food knowledge, skills and abilities. Students will engage in applied learning and develop leadership skills in the agribusiness and food realm. 

Catalog Year

2022-2023

Degree

Bachelor of Science

Major Credits

66

Total Credits

120

Locations

Mankato

Program Requirements

Required General Education

* CIS 101, ECON 201, and MATH 130 must be completed for admission to the major.

Introduction to the personal computer as a productivity tool for business majors. Using Microsoft Office suite, students learn to be productive with document processing, spreadsheets, electronic presentations, and databases. Cannot be used toward any major or minor in Computer Information Science.

Prerequisites: none

Emphasis on forces influencing employment and inflation. Current problems of the economy are stressed along with tools government has to cope with them.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-05

This course develops concepts and skills in algebra and introductory calculus needed to model applications in business, economics, social sciences and life sciences, using polynomials, exponentials, logarithms, linear systems, linear programming, sequences, series, derivatives and integrals.

Prerequisites: Satisfy Placement Table in this section, or grade of ā€œCā€ (2.0) or better in either MATH 112 or MATH 115.

Goal Areas: GE-04

Choose 3 Credit(s).

Discussion of theories of value and obligation.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06, GE-09

Discussion of the ways that a culture both creates human community and shapes self-identity. Exploration of similarities and differences between and interdependence among cultural traditions, and of vocabularies for assessing traditions.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06, GE-08

Ethical perspectives relevant to issues such as euthanasia, genetic engineering, organ transplant, patients' rights, abortion, etc.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06, GE-09

Introduction to ethical theories and concepts and their application to specific cases in the world of business.V

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06, GE-09

Questions about human responsibilities to other animals and the environment gain urgency as environmental crises become more prevalent, and animal species continue to be eliminated. Learn about, critique, and apply the principles underlying evaluations of human environmental conduct.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-09, GE-10

Consideration of the basic philosophical approaches to the idea of justice and how this idea relates to other fundamental ideas in political philosophy, ethics, and law.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06, GE-09

Prerequisites to the Major

The accounting process, financial statement preparation, and analysis. Includes the accounting cycle, asset, liability, and equity accounting. Emphasis on the use of accounting data.

Prerequisites: MATH 112 or MATH 115or MATH 121 or MATH 130 or MATH 181

This course is required for admission to the College of Business for all business majors. The purpose of the course is to provide students with an overview of COB majors, allow students to create an academic plan for graduation, and develop professional skills needed for future job placement. Topics include cover letter and resume writing, interviewing skills, the process of networking, the internship program, etiquette skills, and requirements for graduation.

Prerequisites: none

Major Common Core

Required of all College of Business Majors

Preparation and analysis of cost-based management reports: use of cost information to make short-term operating decisions and long-term capital decisions.

Prerequisites: ACCT 200

Application of law to business settings; the American court system; alternative dispute resolution; ethics and the social responsibility of business; fundamentals of legal reasoning; sources of law; constitutional, criminal, tort, and contract law; business associations.

Prerequisites: none

Examines decision making by the individual firm, the determination of prices and wages, and current problems facing business firms.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-05

Basic statistical methods including measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, probability distributions, sampling, problems of estimation and hypothesis testing in the case of one and two sample meaans and proportions. Chi-Square, one-way analysis of variance, simple regression and correlation analysis, and brief introduction to multiple regression analysis. Use of computer statistical packages required.

Prerequisites: MATH 112 or equivalent

Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-04

An introduction to finance relating to problems, methods, and policies in financing business enterprise.

Prerequisites: ACCT 200

International dimensions of business: global business environment (economic, cultural, legal, political) and international business functions (management, marketing, finance, exporting, importing).

Prerequisites: none

This course examines basic management concepts and principles, their historical development, and their application to modern organizations. Topics covered include planning, organizing, decision making, leadership, control, and organizational change. In addition, the course includes an introduction to business ethics and social responsibility, human resource management, organizational design and organizational behavior.

Prerequisites: none

This course is designed to introduce students to the Management Information Systems and its application in organizations. The course will present to the students the information systems role to support the various managerial activities, and to help the students identify and evaluate various options in Management Information Systems.

Prerequisites: ISYS 101 or CIS 101

This course engages students in the study of the operations management function in manufacturing and service organizations. Students learn how to apply the basic analytical models to operation decisions involving topics such as scheduling, production technology, inventory management, quality assurance, just-in-time production, and others.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 

MGMT 481 is an integrative course for COB majors. Its emphasis is on understanding the role of a general manager, which should include an operations and international component.

Prerequisites: FINA 362, MRKT 210, MGMT 230, MGMT 346

This course provides a basic understanding of marketing concepts with emphasis on the pricing, promotion, and distribution of need satisfying products and services in domestic and international markets. The format of the course consists of lectures, case discussions, application exercises, projects, exams, and in-class group assignments.

Prerequisites: none

Required of all AgriBusiness & Food Majors

This course examines supply chain concepts and principles, theoretical concepts and their application to modern and future agriculture industries. This course will have an emphasis on regional agriculture and food commodities as well as processed food production and manufacturing. Professionals in the agriculture industry will be brought into class to explain how agribusiness supply chain knowledge and skills are essential to various sectors. Students will have an opportunity to broaden their thinking, understanding, and professional potential as related to the agribusiness and food industry while interacting with professionals and facility tours.

Prerequisites: none

The goal of this course is to provide a basic understanding of finance for students entering agribusiness profession. The primary objective of this course is to cover all basic topics, including time value of money, agricultural lending, financial statement analysis following Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), the Farm Credit System, risk in agribusiness, legal matter in agribusiness, national and international trend in agribusiness finance.

Prerequisites: none

Supervised experience in agribusiness or food related organizations, industry, state, or federal institutions.

Prerequisites: none

This course examines basic business concepts and principles and their application to modern and future agriculture industries. Agribusiness topics covered include commodities, supply chain, finance, sales, accounting, law, engineering, food safety, healthcare, data analysis, and technology. Professionals in the agriculture industry will be brought into class to explain how business knowledge and skills are essential to various sectors; including but not limited to: livestock, poultry, corn/soybeans, bio-fuels, engineering, and natural resources. Students will have an opportunity to broaden their thinking, understanding, and professional potential as related to the agriculture industry while interacting with industry professionals.

Prerequisites: none

Major Restricted Electives

Choose three courses from one of the following business areas: Accounting, Entrepreneurship, Finance, International Business, Marketing, or Supply Chain.

Area A: Accounting - Choose 9 Credit(s).

An in-depth analysis of financial accounting concepts and procedures, and includes coverage of the income statement, balance sheet, time value of money, receivables and inventories.

Prerequisites: ACCT 200

Emphasizes product and service costing, including job order and process costing systems. Other related topics are budgeting, pricing, cost-volume-profit analysis, standards and variance analysis.

Prerequisites: ACCT 200, ACCT 210

A discussion of various accounting information systems. Topics include documentation, internal control, system design, knowledge structures, database design, software evaluation, systems applications and current developments.

Prerequisites: none

The course examines the principles and procedures relating to the determination and computation of federal income taxes for an individual. Federal estate tax, gift tax, and income taxation of estates and trusts are also examined.

Prerequisites: ACCT 200, ACCT 210

The course introduces students to the legal framework for environmental protection in the United States. Students will study the principle treaties, common law, constitutional principles, statutes, and regulations that govern environmental regulation. They will also explore issues of land use and planning, clean air and water laws, sustainability, and emerging environmental legal issues.

Prerequisites: BLAW 200 

Area B: Entrepreneurship - Choose 9 Credit(s).

This class examines major intellectual property legal issues particularly as they apply to business, technology, innovation and digital media. Topics covered include patents, trademarks, copyrights, trade secrets, intellectual property crime, free speech, the internet and social media, innovation and other emerging issues.

Prerequisites: none

The course introduces students to the legal framework for environmental protection in the United States. Students will study the principle treaties, common law, constitutional principles, statutes, and regulations that govern environmental regulation. They will also explore issues of land use and planning, clean air and water laws, sustainability, and emerging environmental legal issues.

Prerequisites: BLAW 200 

This course is designed to develop a students personal creativity and help a student identify the process of organizational innovation. The course is comprised of a combination of short lecture, in-class discussion of readings and videos, writing assignments, an elevator pitch and group activities.

Prerequisites: none

The course is an active learning course where students are immersed in the process of starting a new enterprise. In managing their entrepreneurial projects, students conceptualize and develop business plans that include self-assessment, industry and market analyses, a marketing plan, human resource management, and financial analyses and projections. Students have contact with business professionals and entrepreneurs via field trips, guest speakers, and entrepreneurial networking events.

Prerequisites: none

Area C: Finance - Choose 9 Credit(s).

Introduction to analytic tools and techniques using business applications.Grading Method

Prerequisites: ECON 207

Applications of financial principles and analytical tools through the use of case studies and problems from local businesses.

Prerequisites: FINA 362 

Introduction to money and capital markets, instruments and institutions. Consideration of the management problems of financial institutions.

Prerequisites: FINA 362 

Examination of the fundamentals of the insurance industry; the risk management process; and commercial insurance exposures and policies including commercial property, general liability, and workers' compensation.

Prerequisites: none

Trading practices and procedures utilizing these contracts in hedging and risk management policies for business.

Prerequisites: FINA 362 

Area D: International Business - Choose 9 Credit(s).

Topics on current developments in international business, technology, and legislation.

Prerequisites: IBUS 380 

Managerial approach to marketing decision making in multicultural market situations.

Prerequisites: MRKT 210, IBUS 380

This course examines cross-cultural differences in business practices. Among the topics covered are the differences in management styles, multiculturalism, international negotiations, as well as international human resource issues, social responsibility and ethics in a global context, international labor relations, cultural synergy and multicultural teams.

Prerequisites: none

International finance functions in a corporation include currency issues, investment, financial markets interacting, raising debt and equity, and export financing.

Prerequisites: IBUS 380 

Provides knowledge and documentary skills in managing and implementing the export operations of firms engaged in international trade.

Prerequisites: IBUS 380 

Area E: Marketing - Choose 9 Credit(s).

The course is designed to provide basic human motivation theories, and develop persuasive communications strategies and applications necessary in the field of professional selling. The course takes a hands-on approach to professional selling techniques with the use of sales presentations, sales manuals, and exams.

Prerequisites: MRKT 210

Students will learn about consumer decision styles, perceptions, group influences, family decision-making, lifestyles, shopping behaviors and domestic and international trends related to marketing strategies. The framework consists of individual or group projects, usually requiring some personal interviewing, exams, and reports.

Prerequisites: none

Integrated Marketing Communications provide an understanding of the elements of the marketing communications mix; advertising, public relations, personal selling, sales promotion and corporate sponsorship through traditional and digital media.

Prerequisites: MRKT 210

In this course, students will examine the role of research in decision making and the basics of scientific research, including the preparation of research proposals, design of data collection instruments, data analysis, interpretation, and reporting.

Prerequisites: ECON 207, MRKT 210

A broad examination of the techniques employed in business-to-business marketing. Topics include organizational buying, buyer-seller relationships and industrial marketing mix development.

Prerequisites: MRKT 210

This course is an examination of the role of digital technology, such as the Internet and social media platforms, in contemporary marketing strategy and its impact on business decision making and consumer behavior.

Prerequisites: MRKT 210

This course involves studying the role of the general sales manager, the functions of sales management within overall marketing strategy, and the development of analytical decision skills necessary to plan, manage, and control the sales force.

Prerequisites: MRKT 210

Area F: Supply Chain - Choose 9 Credit(s).

Provides knowledge and documentary skills in managing and implementing the export operations of firms engaged in international trade.

Prerequisites: IBUS 380 

This course is designed to prepare students to design and develop personal computer based information systems for management control and decision making using end-user software including spreadsheets and data base management systems. Students will design and develop several information systems as group projects.

Prerequisites: MGMT 230, MGMT 300

A study of how supply chain management impacts all processes of the firm and its many trading partners. The supply chain management foundation elements of purchasing, operations, logistics, and integration are examined to show how a firm can improve its competitive position by employing these important foundation elements.

Prerequisites: MRKT 210

A broad examination of the techniques employed in business-to-business marketing. Topics include organizational buying, buyer-seller relationships and industrial marketing mix development.

Prerequisites: MRKT 210

Major Unrestricted Electives

Choose 6 - 8 Credit(s).

Exploring culture through the foods we eat, preparation practices, and historic implications of food in daily life. We will examine a sampling from hunter-gathers, agricultural practices and animal husbandry, mass production, and the food industry to better understand cultural practices from around the globe.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

This course examines the history of agricultural systems in world wide perspective, with an emphasis on understanding their social and environmental contexts and the effects on them of climate change. Case examples will highlight the conditions under which agricultural systems emerge, thrive, and fail, and the impacts of these processes on human populations.

Prerequisites: none

Biology of plants including unique features of plant cells, life histories, metabolism, anatomy, physiology, and ecology. The course empathizes plants' remarkable adaptations to their environments, their diversity, and the vital roles they play in ecological interactions. For biology and environmental science majors and minors. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105 and BIOL 106 or consent 

The structure and function of stream ecosystems are presented with emphasis on adaptations of organisms to stream life and connections between stream organisms, the aquatic environment, and the surrounding watershed. Includes lab, field work, and team projects. Prereq: BIOL 105W, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 or consentSummer

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 or consent

A field course in the ecology of birds, mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and fishes. Students are trained in sampling techniques such as mark-and-recapture, population size estimation and monitoring, and species identification of live and preserved specimens. Lectures encompass evolution and adoption, origins, energetics, mating systems, morphology, geographical distributions, and population-level phenomena. Lecture and Laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 or consent 

Soil ecology will focus on the genesis and classification of soils, the physical properties of soil as they relate to habitat formation, niches, interactions that exist among soil organisms, human impact on soil systems relative to population pressures and management practices. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215, or consent 

This course is an introduction to the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics and interactions of inland freshwater lakes. Labs will emphasize field work, including data collection from five local lakes, analysis, and discussion.

Prerequisites: none

Plant functions such as water relations, mineral nutrition, translocation, metabolisms, photosynthesis, photorespiration, fat and protein metabolism, respiration, growth and development, phytohormones, reproduction and environmental physiology. Lab included. (One semester organic chemistry is recommended.)

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 217, one semester organic chemistry recommended. 

Expands upon general principles of ecology to focus on the factors that regulate the distribution and abundance of plants, analysis of plant populations, and dynamics of plant communities. Lecture and lab (fieldwork) included. (Taking BIOL 217 is strongly recommended before taking this class.)

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 or consent. BIOL 217 strongly recommended. 

The role microbes play in production and spoilage of food products, as prepared for mass market. Topics include foodborn pathogens, epidemiology and control, essential principles in sanitation including Hazard Analysis/Critical Control Point and ISO 9000 requirements. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106 and BIOL 270 

Introduction to written and visual communication of technical information in agricultural contexts. Through rhetorical analysis, collaborative and independent writing, and usability testing, students will learn strategies to produce clear, concise, accurate, and effective documents and presentations.

Prerequisites: none

This is a lecture course introducing students to major federal environmental laws and regulations. Discussions include the cause(s) that prompted the enactment of various environmental legislation as well as intent and implementation of the legislation. Both Federal and State of MN environmental statutes will be discussed.

Prerequisites: none

Introduces students to basic food preparation and culinary techniques. Students look at different cultures and the roles of individuals and nations in a global context using food habits as a model.

Prerequisites: none

Principles of food services operations related to menu planning, standardized recipes, production and service for profit and nonprofit settings.

Prerequisites: none

Study of why, how, and when physical and chemical phenomena occur during the preparation of food and its products. Includes discussion and laboratory experience demonstrating how preparation methods affect food quality, composition, and nutritive value. Includes NRA ServSafe certification.

Prerequisites: FCS 150

Planning, preparing and serving meals with emphasis on effective management, nutritive needs, purchasing, and equipment. Includes quantity food service laboratory.

Prerequisites: FCS 252, FCS 340, FCS 350 

Principles of food services management related to budgeting, food safety and operational sanitation, analysis and control of quality and quantity in institutional and public food service operations.

Prerequisites: FCS 252 

Food quality, safety, formulation, processing, preservation, and biotechnology are explored. Original food science experiments are planned, executed, interpreted, and presented using appropriate scientific techniques.

Prerequisites: ENG 271W, FCS 340, HLTH 475 

The characteristics of particular climates and understanding the factors that control their spatial distribution.

Prerequisites: none

This course examines the dynamic nature of soils including the processes that control formation and degradation, anthropogenic impacts, spatial distribution across landscapes, and links among soils and other components of the earth system. A combination of lectures and hands-on exercises in field and laboratory settings are utilized to explore the complex interactions between soils and landscapes.

Prerequisites: none

This course examines basic concepts and components of soils, factors that influence formation and degradation, soil as a natural resource for ecosystems and societies, and the importance of soil conservation to restore functions that reduce erosion, improve water quality and quantity, mitigate climate change, enhance biodiversity, and increase agricultural productivity to feed an expanding population. Students will gain hands-on experience in field and laboratory settings to assess soil quality and quantity, investigate site-specific and landscape-scale impacts to soils, and develop management strategies to protect and improve soils in urban and agricultural systems.

Prerequisites: none

An interdisciplinary investigation into Quaternary environmental/climatic change and the impact of change on the behavior and evolution of humans. This course has three segments: 1) An examination of natural systems responsible for climatic change, the impact climatic fluctuations have on Earth systems, timing of Quaternary changes, evidence of climatic/environmental change from spatially distant, climatically distinct environments; 2) Investigation into worldwide evidence of human evolution, global dispersion, and adaptation to environmental systems; 3) Introduction into various methodological approaches in Quaternary archeologic, geomorphic, and climatic studies. Focus is on proxy records used for climate/environmental reconstruction, archeologic/geomorphic field methods, geochronologic dating methods.

Prerequisites: Either GEOG 101 or ANTH 210; We strongly encourage students to take GEOG 315 before enrolling. Geol 121 can be substituted for GEOG 101 with instructor permission.

An introduction to the multidisciplinary field of soil science and fertility. The course will examine the basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils. Further topics will explore soil genesis, soil health and management, and their relationships to crop production. Field trips and lab activities will be used to explore key concepts, with emphasis on examples relevant to the soils of southern Minnesota. Local field trips included.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Biogeochemical processes specific to soil and engineered sediments, including applications of solubility, adsorption/desorption, ion exchange, oxidation/reduction, acidity, alkalinity. Discussion of problems related to environmental degradation, plant nutrition, soil genesis, and element cycling (e.g. P, N, C). Structural chemistry, origin/identification of crystalline soil clay minerals, and soil organic matter will be covered in context with the mechanisms for reactivity in the soil environment.

Prerequisites: CHEM 191, CHEM 201, GEOL/BIOL 104 or instructor permission.

The application of geologic data and principles to problems created by human occupancy and use of the physical environment. Lecture and laboratory topics include soil classification and conservation, hazardous waste site evaluation and remediation, and living with geologic hazards.

Prerequisites: GEOL 121 

To promote identification and analysis of environmental influences upon health status. Health concerns related to residential, occupational, and other environments are explored. Problems pertaining to air, water, solid waste, housing, land use, toxic waste, and sanitation are addressed.

Prerequisites: none

Philosophical issues concerning the mental lives of non-human animals, with emphasis on consciousness, rationality, language, and implications for non-human animal ethics.

Prerequisites: none

This course will identify and analyze global social, economic, political and environmental problems impacting community viability and explore the full range of solutions to these problems. The course will view communities as complex, sustainable organisms and bring together the works of the great minds working on sustainability.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-05, GE-10

Minor

A minor is not required.

4-Year Plan

The 4-Year Plan is a model for completing your degree in a timely manner. Your individual 4-Year plan may change based on a number of variables including transfer courses and the semester/year you start your major. Carefully work with your academic advisors to devise your own unique plan.
* Please meet with your advisor on appropriate course selection to meet your educational and degree goals.

First Year

Fall - 16 Credits

This course develops concepts and skills in algebra and introductory calculus needed to model applications in business, economics, social sciences and life sciences, using polynomials, exponentials, logarithms, linear systems, linear programming, sequences, series, derivatives and integrals.

Prerequisites: Satisfy Placement Table in this section, or grade of ā€œCā€ (2.0) or better in either MATH 112 or MATH 115.

Goal Areas: GE-04

General Education Course * 3 credits

General Education Course * 3 credits

General Education Course * 3 credits

Spring - 14 Credits

The accounting process, financial statement preparation, and analysis. Includes the accounting cycle, asset, liability, and equity accounting. Emphasis on the use of accounting data.

Prerequisites: MATH 112 or MATH 115or MATH 121 or MATH 130 or MATH 181

Emphasis on forces influencing employment and inflation. Current problems of the economy are stressed along with tools government has to cope with them.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-05

This course is required for admission to the College of Business for all business majors. The purpose of the course is to provide students with an overview of COB majors, allow students to create an academic plan for graduation, and develop professional skills needed for future job placement. Topics include cover letter and resume writing, interviewing skills, the process of networking, the internship program, etiquette skills, and requirements for graduation.

Prerequisites: none

General Education Course * 3 credits

General Education Course * 3 credits

Second Year

Fall - 15 Credits

This course provides a basic understanding of marketing concepts with emphasis on the pricing, promotion, and distribution of need satisfying products and services in domestic and international markets. The format of the course consists of lectures, case discussions, application exercises, projects, exams, and in-class group assignments.

Prerequisites: none

This course examines basic management concepts and principles, their historical development, and their application to modern organizations. Topics covered include planning, organizing, decision making, leadership, control, and organizational change. In addition, the course includes an introduction to business ethics and social responsibility, human resource management, organizational design and organizational behavior.

Prerequisites: none

An introduction to finance relating to problems, methods, and policies in financing business enterprise.

Prerequisites: ACCT 200

BUS 397 provides students an entrepreneurial real-world learning opportunity. Students gain additional insight into business concepts by applying the material in a real-world environment and gaining insight into the integrated nature of business. The class focuses on learning to develop and operate a business entity. Student teams will operate their own company, obtain an actual bank loan, and sell their chosen products throughout the semester. The class provides an opportunity to practice business skills such as communication, problem-solving, and leadership. Students learn what it takes for entrepreneurs to succeed while giving back through community service.

Prerequisites: Must be admitted to a major.

General Education Course * 3 credits

Spring - 15 Credits

Examines decision making by the individual firm, the determination of prices and wages, and current problems facing business firms.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-05

Basic statistical methods including measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, probability distributions, sampling, problems of estimation and hypothesis testing in the case of one and two sample meaans and proportions. Chi-Square, one-way analysis of variance, simple regression and correlation analysis, and brief introduction to multiple regression analysis. Use of computer statistical packages required.

Prerequisites: MATH 112 or equivalent

Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-04

Preparation and analysis of cost-based management reports: use of cost information to make short-term operating decisions and long-term capital decisions.

Prerequisites: ACCT 200

International dimensions of business: global business environment (economic, cultural, legal, political) and international business functions (management, marketing, finance, exporting, importing).

Prerequisites: none

Other Graduation Requirements Course * 2 credits

Third Year

Fall - 15 Credits

Application of law to business settings; the American court system; alternative dispute resolution; ethics and the social responsibility of business; fundamentals of legal reasoning; sources of law; constitutional, criminal, tort, and contract law; business associations.

Prerequisites: none

This course is designed to introduce students to the Management Information Systems and its application in organizations. The course will present to the students the information systems role to support the various managerial activities, and to help the students identify and evaluate various options in Management Information Systems.

Prerequisites: ISYS 101 or CIS 101

This course examines supply chain concepts and principles, theoretical concepts and their application to modern and future agriculture industries. This course will have an emphasis on regional agriculture and food commodities as well as processed food production and manufacturing. Professionals in the agriculture industry will be brought into class to explain how agribusiness supply chain knowledge and skills are essential to various sectors. Students will have an opportunity to broaden their thinking, understanding, and professional potential as related to the agribusiness and food industry while interacting with professionals and facility tours.

Prerequisites: none

This course examines basic business concepts and principles and their application to modern and future agriculture industries. Agribusiness topics covered include commodities, supply chain, finance, sales, accounting, law, engineering, food safety, healthcare, data analysis, and technology. Professionals in the agriculture industry will be brought into class to explain how business knowledge and skills are essential to various sectors; including but not limited to: livestock, poultry, corn/soybeans, bio-fuels, engineering, and natural resources. Students will have an opportunity to broaden their thinking, understanding, and professional potential as related to the agriculture industry while interacting with industry professionals.

Prerequisites: none

Required General Education Course * 3 credits

Spring - 15 Credits

This course engages students in the study of the operations management function in manufacturing and service organizations. Students learn how to apply the basic analytical models to operation decisions involving topics such as scheduling, production technology, inventory management, quality assurance, just-in-time production, and others.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 

The goal of this course is to provide a basic understanding of finance for students entering agribusiness profession. The primary objective of this course is to cover all basic topics, including time value of money, agricultural lending, financial statement analysis following Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), the Farm Credit System, risk in agribusiness, legal matter in agribusiness, national and international trend in agribusiness finance.

Prerequisites: none

Course in Emphasis * 3 credits

Elective Course in Major * 3 credits

General Education Course * 3 credits

Fourth Year

Fall - 15 Credits

MGMT 481 is an integrative course for COB majors. Its emphasis is on understanding the role of a general manager, which should include an operations and international component.

Prerequisites: FINA 362, MRKT 210, MGMT 230, MGMT 346

Elective Course in Major * 3 credits

Other Graduation Requirements Course * 3 credits

General Education Course * 3 credits

Elective Course in Major * 3 credits

Spring - 15 Credits

Supervised experience in agribusiness or food related organizations, industry, state, or federal institutions.

Prerequisites: none

Course in Emphasis * 3 credits

General Education Course * 3 credits

Other Graduation Requirements Course * 3 credits

Other Graduation Requirements Course * 3 credits