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Minnesota State University, Mankato
Minnesota State University, Mankato

2014

Page address: https://www.mnsu.edu/constitutionday/2014_events.html

All activities will be held in Centennial Student Union 253-4-5, unless otherwise indicated. Visitors will receive a complimentary pocket Constitution book!

Minnesota State Mankato Celebrates Constitution Day – September 17th

Event Planner

Subject to Change/Updated Daily

Time Location Discussant and/or Session Moderator Topic Media Accompaniment Courtesy of "The Constitution Project"* Constitution Café…Smart conversation with the National Constitution Center

Session Visitors – Bring your laptops or mobile devices to contribute to the ongoing, online discussion.

8:00-9:00am

Centennial Student Union

Room 253-4-5

Dr. Joseph Kunkel, Dept. Government

Creating a Constitution

America almost didn't have a Constitution. Rhode Island even refused to send delegates to the convention. But the other 55 delegates from 12 states bickered and compromised their way to a document that is still thriving over 200 years later.

Republic, Found: The relationship between the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution

Read, Reflect, and Connect: http://blog.constitutioncenter.org/2014/07/republic-found-the-relationship-between-the-declaration-and-constitution/

9:00-10:00am

Centennial Student Union

Room 253-4-5

One Person One Vote

Everyone’s vote counts equally. This idea might seem central to how our democracy works, but it's been a long and hard battle to make sure one person actually equals one vote.

Should the voting age be lowered again?

Read, Reflect, and Connect: http://blog.constitutioncenter.org/2014/08/constitution-cafe-should-the-voting-age-be-lowered-again/

10:00-11:00am

Centennial Student Union

Room 253-4-5

The Bill of Rights

Freedom of speech, religion, assembly, the right to a jury trial, we all know these are protected by the Constitution. But they weren’t in the original version. In fact, many of the framers were dead set against including them.

Is it too difficult to change the Constitution?

Read, Reflect, and Connect: http://blog.constitutioncenter.org/2014/06/discuss-is-it-too-difficult-to-change-the-constitution/

11:00am-12:00pm

Centennial Student Union

Room 253-4-5

Dr. Susan Burum, Dept. Government

A Gordian Knot: The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby

Podcast: The Court's Hobby Lobby decision

Listen, Reflect, and Connect: http://blog.constitutioncenter.org/2014/06/podcast-the-courts-controversial-hobby-lobby-decision/

12:00-1:00pm

Centennial Student Union

Room 253-4-5

Dr. Jill Cooley, Dept. History

A Call to Act

Lilly Ledbetter found out she was being paid less than her male counterparts. She fought for her rights and ended up with her name on the first bill signed by President Barack Obama.

Next 10 Amendments: Do we need an Equal Rights Amendment?

Read, Reflect, and Connect: http://blog.constitutioncenter.org/2013/08/next-10-amendments-equal-rights-for-all/

1:00-2:00pm

Centennial Student Union

Room 253-4-5

Dr. Fred Slocum, Dept. Government

Treatment of LGBT issues generally at the Supreme Court level, covering Romer v. Evans (1996), the James Dale case with the Boy Scouts (2000), Lawrence v. Texas (2003), and Windsor v. U.S. (2013).

Constitution Check: What are the Supreme Court's options now on same-sex marriage?

Read, Reflect, and Connect: http://blog.constitutioncenter.org/2014/09/constitution-check-what-are-the-supreme-courts-options-now-on-same-sex-marriage/

2:00-3:00pm

Centennial Student Union

Room 253-4-5

Dr. Pat Nelson, Law Enforcement Program, Dept. of Government

"The Right to Remain Silent: Miranda v. Arizona"

"You have the right to remain silent." But it wasn't until Ernesto Miranda's case that our country determined how best to protect this crucial right.

Why would a terrorism suspect be given Miranda warnings?

Read, Reflect, and Connect: http://blog.constitutioncenter.org/2013/04/constitution-check-why-would-a-terrorism-suspect-be-given-miranda-warnings/

2:30-3:30pm

Memorial Library - ERC level

Classroom ML45

Leslie M. Peterson, Assistant to the Dean – Library Services

Excerpts from "Not for Ourselves Alone: The Story of Elizabeth Cady Stanton & Susan B. Anthony" a film by Ken Burns and Paul Barnes

Visitors are encouraged to come early or stay after the showing to engage with a book display and other materials by and about these important American women featured in the film.

3:00-4:00pm

Centennial Student Union

Room 253-4-5

One Man Changes the Constitution

Clarence Earl Gideon didn't have a lawyer. He couldn't afford one. So from his jail cell he hand wrote a letter to the Supreme Court of the United States asking it for help, and in doing so changed American law for everyone.

Does the Constitution need part of the Declaration of Independence attached?

Read, Reflect, and Connect: http://blog.constitutioncenter.org/2014/02/discuss-does-the-constitution-need-part-of-the-declaration-of-independence-attached/

4:00-6:00pm

Centennial Student Union

Ostrander Auditorium

Dr. Jill Cooley, Dept. History

Freedom Riders

Attracting a diverse group of volunteers—black and white, young and old, male and female, secular and religious, northern and southern—the Freedom Rides of 1961 took the civil rights struggle out of the courtroom and onto the streets of the Jim Crow South. Freedom Riders tells the terrifying, moving, and suspenseful story of a time when white and black volunteers riding a bus into the Deep South risked being jailed, beaten, or killed, as white local and state authorities ignored or encouraged violent attacks. The film includes previously unseen amateur 8-mm footage of the burning bus on which some Freedom Riders were temporarily trapped, taken by a local twelve-year-old and held as evidence since 1961 by the FBI.

6:00-7:00pm

Centennial Student Union

Room 253-4-5

Search and Seizure

For most of the 20th century, police didn't need a warrant to search your home. That was before Dolly Mapp fought back.

The Next 10 Amendments: A constitutional amendment to define marriage?

Read, Reflect, and Connect: http://blog.constitutioncenter.org/2013/07/the-next-10-amendments-the-federal-regulation-of-marriage/

7:00-8:00pm

Centennial Student Union

Room 253-4-5

An Independent Judiciary

The Constitution establishes three branches of government: the Executive, Legislative and Judicial. So why did it take 150 years to ensure that the third branch, the courts, remained independent?

Debate the Constitution: More House members?

Read, Reflect, and Connect: http://blog.constitutioncenter.org/2014/04/debate-the-constitution-more-house-members/

8:00-9:00pm

Jury Selection: Edmonson v. Leesville

Thaddeus Edmonson had a personal injury case. Not so remarkable on its face. But his case would forever change how civil trials are conducted in the US.

Congress, elections top concerns in Next 10 Amendments project

Read, Reflect, and Connect: http://blog.constitutioncenter.org/2013/09/congress-elections-top-concerns-in-next-10-amendments-project/

9:00-10:00pm

Yick Wo and the Equal Protection Clause

Yick Wo wasn’t a citizen. He wasn’t even allowed to become one. But that didn’t stop him from standing up for his rights — and protecting the rights of us all.

Next 10 Amendments: Eliminate the Electoral College?

Read, Reflect, and Connect: http://blog.constitutioncenter.org/2013/07/next-10-amendments-eliminate-the-electoral-college/

10:00-11:00pm

Korematsu and Civil Liberties

In 1942, Fred Korematsu was arrested. His crime? Being Japanese-American. He was jailed and for 40 years had a criminal record. Finally he fought back.

Next 10 Amendments: The separation of church and state.

Read, Reflect, and Connect: http://blog.constitutioncenter.org/2013/07/next-10-amendments-the-separation-of-church-and-state/

Flipped Constitution Day – Get Prepared for the Day (Courtesy, History Channel)

  • America Gets a Constitution (4 minutes): After several failed attempts at creating a government, a 1787 convention is called to draft a new legal system for the United States. This new Constitution provides for increased federal authority while still protecting the basic rights of its citizens.
  • The Founding Fathers Unite (3 minutes): Who wrote which parts of the anonymous Federalist Papers? Madison and Jefferson disagree.
  • James Madison: Did you Know? (2 minutes): At just 5'4", James Madison was hardly a commanding presence, but that didn't stop him from shaping American history.

Take the ConstitutionFacts.com CHALLENGE!

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