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Minnesota State University, Mankato
Minnesota State University, Mankato

2018-2019 Courses

Page address: https://www.mnsu.edu/honors/20182019courses.html

 

FALL 2018 COURSES

Introduction to Honors (HONR 201) 1 Credit

This course is required for students who transfer into the Honors program or who join without taking the FYEX course. This course provides an orientation to the mission and core competencies of the Honors Program. Students will analyze and categorize leadership, research, and global citizenship themes, identify appropriate learning goals, and develop an e-portfolio for their use in the Honors Program.

 

Portraits of Culture (ANTH 250W) 4 credits, Dr. Schalge

Tuesdays & Thursdays, 12:30pm - 1:45pm

Gen Ed 5, Purple, Writing Intensive


How are portraits made?  What elements are key to successfully and accurately representing something or someone?  How are portraits of culture “painted”?  Two of the most significant tasks of anthropologists are studying cultures (first-hand fieldwork) and communicating the results of those studies to others.  Ethnographers’ findings are most often shared in the form of ethnographies.  Culture, like a tapestry or painting, is made up of multiple threads and colors that are woven together to produce a unique picture or pattern.  An ethnography, or monograph, is supposed to provide the reader with a detailed picture and understanding of a particular culture.  Malinowski, the Father of modern field methods in Anthropology, wrote that, “[t]he goal is, briefly, to grasp the native’s point of view, his relation to life, to realise his vision of his world.” (1922: 25)  It will be our common purpose this semester, to explore how this is done.  

 

There are numerous ways to study and portray culture.  Thus, we will read and compare a variety of ethnographies from different perspectives, time periods, and geographic regions.  The goals of the course are to: 1) understand the concept of culture and how it is used in Anthropology; 2) explore a variety of ways to portray cultures; and 3) apply what we learn by writing our own ethnographic portraits.  Ultimately, you should understand what it means to both think and write from an anthropological perspective.

 

 

World History since 1500 to Present (HIST 171) 4 Credits, Dr. Odinga

Mondays & Wednesdays 10am - 11:50am

Gen Ed 5, 8, Purple


The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of human interactions as people were brought increasingly into contact with one another after 1500. Our focus will be on Leadership in Modern World History.  Throughout the semester we will explore how world leaders have shaped our contemporary world through their decision, action or inaction.

 

An Exploration of Yoga: A Journey of Discovery (HONR 401) 3 credits, Carly Hopper

Wednesdays 6pm - 8:50pm 

Honors Competency Areas Addressed: Global Citizenship, Leadership

This course will introduce students to the eight limbs of yoga: Yama, Niyama, Asana, Pranayama, Pratyahara, Dharana, Dhyana, and Samadhi. Students will explore the philosophy of yoga as it relates to social, religious, historical, holistic, and political issues around the globe. Students will develop self-awareness of how yoga can be a personal journey to discover their own physical body, energy body, mental body, intellectual body, and divine body. Students will cultivate a deeper understanding of the yoga philosophy and practice through an academic lens and physical practice.

 

 

Reading the News (HONR 401) 4 credits, Rachael Hanel

Mondays & Wednesdays, 12pm - 1:45 p.m.

Honors Competency Areas Addressed: Global Citizenship, Research

The news is all around us. But with the onslaught of information that bombards us daily, how can we best discern the most useful sources? What constitutes a credible, reliable source? What does it mean to become a well-rounded, media literate citizen? In this class, you will learn the importance of finding news and information from a variety of sources. You will engage with print, online, and broadcast sources, discovering a variety of information that you may otherwise not seek out on your own. Topics covered include analyzing the news and how it is reported; bias; “fake” news; and the media’s role in a democracy.

 

Developing Your Mentor Philosophy, (HONR 401) 1 Credit

Tuesdays 10am - 11am

This course will provide opportunities for in-depth investigation into leadership styles and methods, aiming to guide discovery and development of each student’s personal mentor philosophy. Students will apply their mentor philosophies throughout the semester by collaborating with and guiding new Honors students through various mentoring opportunities. Students participating in this course will be expected to work together to help create these mentoring opportunities, as well as be available and open to other students as mentors in the Honors Program. The goals of this course are to help students discover mentor qualities, to guide students to become more comfortable and confident with what it means to be a mentor, to utilize students’ strengths and weaknesses to build their individual mentor philosophy, to provide opportunities for students to practice their mentor philosophies, and to contribute to student portfolio development in leadership competencies.

 

Honors Senior Portfolio (HONR 475) 1 Credit (online class), Dr. Anne Dahlman

This required course for seniors in the program allows the student to articulate where and how he or she has met the Honors Program Learning Outcomes.

 

 

 

SPRING 2019 COURSES

 

Introduction to Honors (HONR 201) 1 Credit

This course is required for students who transfer into the Honors program or who join without taking the FYEX course. This course provides an orientation to the mission and core competencies of the Honors Program. Students will analyze and categorize leadership, research, and global citizenship themes, identify appropriate learning goals, and develop an e-portfolio for their use in the Honors Program.

 

Public Speaking (CMST 102) 3 credits, Dr. Brown

Gen Ed 1B


This is an introductory course in the theory and practice of public speaking. The skills you will develop in this course include analyzing the speaking situation, choosing appropriate topics, conducting research, organizing ideas, utilizing evidence, delivering speeches effectively, and the ability to listen critically. The main purpose of this course is to help you develop your oral communication abilities and as such you should not expect a great deal of time will be spent in lecture or discussion of the reading assignments. Instead, time will be spent applying the content of the course readings to the practice of public speaking.

 

Introduction to Psychological Science (PSYC 101) 4 credits, Dr. Lassonde

Gen Ed 5


The goal of this course is to give you a broad overview of the concepts and themes involved in the field of psychology, the scientific study of behavior. In this course we will explore the science of psychology by examining theoretical aspects and then applying them in class discussions, assignments/exams, and everyday situations. Together we will examine the following broad topics of psychology: Origins of psychology, basic research methods, brain and behavior, nature and nurture of behavior, development, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, memory and cognition, thinking and intelligence, personality, psychological disorders/therapy, and social psychology.

 

HONR401: Somali and Somali American Literature, Art, and Music, 4 credits,                 Dr. Danielle Haque

Mondays & Wednesdays 10am - 11:45am

Honors Competency Areas Addressed: Global Citizenship, Research

How does the historical movement of people across boundaries of language, culture, and place, together with increasing globalization, transform our understandings of culture and citizenship?  How does writing contribute to the process of imagining the space of the nation in the wake of colonization? We will tackle these questions through exploring contemporary Somali literature and film, thinking about how these texts enable us to arrive at a sense of how we belong to our localities, our cultures, and to the world.  You will learn about Somali and Somali American cultures, with an emphasis on the experiences and writing of Somali Americans living in Minnesota, while also thinking through larger questions about our relationships to the places we will in and the cultures that surrounds us. In order to contextualize the literature we are reading, we will learn about Somali history, including the history of colonialism, independence, conflict, and migration, by reading in the fields of sociology, history, and political science.  The content is global in scope, but also focused on our local Minnesota, Mankato, and university communities, and we will attend campus events and travel to Minneapolis. 

 

HONR401: Preparing for Successful Undergraduate Research Activity, 3 credits, by Dr. Anne Dahlman and Dr. Kuldeep Agarwal (URC Director)

Honors Competency Area Addressed: Research

This course is designed for students who are in the process of exploring opportunities for engaging in research on campus. This course will help students to become more knowledgeable about the process of conducting research, including understanding what research looks like in different disciplines, skills associated with doing high quality research as an undergraduate student, finding a research mentor/team, applying for funding to conduct research, and planning for research activities across a student’s time in college. Students will participate in the Undergraduate Research Symposium by volunteering for the conference, attending and analyzing poster and oral sessions.   

 

Fair Trade Study Abroad in Belize (HONR 401) 3 credits, Dr. Kristin Scott

Wednesdays 6:00pm  - 8:00pm

Honors Competency Areas Addressed: Global Citizenship, Research

Fair Trade Study Abroad in Belize meets once a week during the semester, both before and after spring break. The structure of the course is focused on reading, discussions, and papers before the trip. During spring break, students will visit fair trade producers in Belize (including several Mayan chocolate producers!), participate in a service-learning activity and absorb the local culture. By the end of the semester, students will use what they have learned to help resolve business issues at a Belizean business. This will have an additional course fee.

 

Honors Senior Portfolio (HONR 475) 1 Credit (online class), Dr. Anne Dahlman

This required course for seniors in the program allows the student to articulate where and how he or she has met the Honors Program Learning Outcomes.