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Minnesota State University, Mankato
Minnesota State University, Mankato

2014 to 2015

Page address: https://www.mnsu.edu/its/academic/fall2014isalt.html

 

 

Project 1: Examining the self-efficacy of future recreation, parks, and leisure services supervisors

As students prepare for their internship experience in the field of recreation, parks, and leisureservices, they often participate in various experiential learning endeavors. These experiential learning opportunities provide students with a great deal of exposure to various elements in the field from program planning and implementation to budget creation and risk management and supervision. To date, little is known about students self-efficacy to engage in supervision roles prior to taking their internship. The goal of this project was to better understand whether students feel prepared to supervise participants and it what ways can education in this area be enhanced. The manuscript about this project has been submitted to Journal of Physical Education, Recreation and Dance.

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Project 2: This is for Real! Examining the effectiveness of a service-learning project in a marketing class

In the business classroom, a hypothetical project is often used to teach students how to apply basic principles. Even though this is often effective is teaching students to apply the material, students may still remain unmotivated because the project is not going to be used beyond the classroom. In the current research, a real-life project is implemented in a promotional strategy class in which students must develop a promotional plan for a local business. This research tests a framework that includes situated learning, motivation, and self-efficacy to determine the effectiveness of this method.

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Project 3: Assessing faculty members’ self-efficacy beliefs about teaching with technology

In this project, the researcher developed a survey that will be used over the next year or two to assess the impact of Quality Matters campus training on faculty members’ attitudes and self-efficacy beliefs about their own abilities to teach with technology.

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Project 4: Formative evaluation of a graduate student certificate program

This project is a year-long formative evaluation of the first cohort of the Certificate of Excellence in Teaching and Learning for Graduate Assistants program. This evaluation is a pre-post test model and includes attitudinal survey data from both participants and faculty members from the participants' programs. Data from this evaluation will be used to revise the program for the following year.

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Project 5: You want me to tweet in class? An analysis of graduate students’ use of twitter in class

During two summer session courses, Twitter was used to assist students' reading and comprehensive of course assignments, expand course discussions, and provide another way for students and faculty to connect. The use of Twitter was mandatory and the guidelines very flexible. This project includes a content analysis of student Tweets and an analysis of the ways students' used Twitter.

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Project 6: An analysis of using twitter to enhance student’s learning and engagement in class

Twitter was used to enhance students' engagement and learning in two fall semester courses. Two different hashtags were created for specific types of Tweets. Analysis will determine if and how the use of Twitter enhanced students' learning and engagement in the courses.

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Project 7: Does the new collaborative classroom enhance teaching and learning? Perspectives from the faculty and students

A classroom has been renovated to support collaborative learning on our campus. In this project, the researchers developed a student survey and faculty interview questions and adopted an observation checklist to evaluate the effectiveness of the learning space. Data collection will start in Spring 2015.

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Project 8: Using differentiated feedback strategies to motivate students in a statistics class

In this study, customized feedback messages were developed based on the Regulatory Focus Theory and the concept of self-efficacy. A randomized block design was adopted to send the feedback to the students in an introductory statistics course. Data were collected throughout the semester to determine whether feedback that matches student goal pursuit orientation can motivate students more effectively.

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Project 9: Teaching Touch Sensing Technologies Using ARM Cortex-M4 Microcontrollers

This paper presents our experiences of introducing in a senior level microprocessor course the latest touch sensing technologies, especially programming capacitive touch sensing devices and touchscreen. Different from the previous work on teaching simple capacitive touch only 8-bit Ardunio board, this work makes use of the 32-bit ARM Cortex-M4 microprocessor to control complex touch sensing devices (i.e., touch keys, touch slider and touchscreen). The Atmel SAM 4S-EK2 board is chosen as the main development board employed for practicing the touch devices programming. Multiple capstone projects have been developed. Our primary experiences indicate that the project-based learning approach with the utilization of the selected microcontroller board and software package is efficient and practical for teaching advanced touch sensing techniques. Students have shown the great interest and the capability in adopting touch devices into their senior design projects to improve human machine interface. This paper has been submitted to Computers in Education Journal.

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