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– Minnesota State University, Mankato
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Minnesota State University, Mankato
Minnesota State University, Mankato

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Page address: https://www.mnsu.edu/supersite/academics/catalogs/graduate/current/english.html

ENGLISH MA and CREATIVE WRITING MFA

College of Arts & Humanities
Department of English
230 Armstrong Hall
507-389-2117
Fax: 507-389-5362


English at Minnesota State University offers four graduate programs, plus graduate certificate programs. Each is designed to meet the needs of a particular audience, so each has its own entrance requirements, curriculum, reading list, comprehensive examination format, and thesis or capstone experience requirements. It is important that prospective students discuss which program best meets their needs with the department chair, the department graduate coordinator, or the individual program head.

Graduate Assistantships
Graduate teaching assistantships and research assistantships are available during the academic year to full-time students. Assistants receive about $9,000 over two semesters and full tuition remission for up to 9 credits per semester. For more information, contact the Department of English.

English MA

English Studies Option

30 Semester Credits with Thesis
34 Semester Credits with Alternate Plan Paper or Portfolio
Contact: Dr. Mary Susan Johnston

The English Studies option offers students the opportunity for broad training in English. This is a generalist degree supported by a department of highly trained specialists in the areas of literature, film, writing and linguistics. The degree is suited for secondary teachers and students who plan to teach at the post-secondary level. This degree may also serve as a basis for careers in the literary marketplace.

Admission Requirements
Applicants must have at least 30 semester hours in language, literature or related courses, with at least 20 credits in upper-division courses. It is highly recommended that applicants have at least one course in a literary figure and one in an upper-division linguistics course. The GRE is not required as part of admissions material for the program. Candidates whose native language is not English must have a TOEFL score of 600 or above. Application materials should include an application form, two letters of recommendation, and official undergraduate transcripts; all sent to the College of Graduate Studies and Research.

Required Courses (9 - 11 credits)

  • ENG 651 Bibliography and Research (3)
  • ENG 698 Internship (3 - 4)

Theory (3-4) - One of the following

  • ENG 516 Film Theory (4)
  • ENG 625 Composition Theory (3)
  • ENG 671 Literary Theory (3)
  • ENG 679 Rhetorical Theory (3) 

Literature Seminars (6 credits): Choose 2

  • ENG 603 Seminar: Selected Authors (3)
  • ENG 605 Seminar: Shakespeare (3)
  • ENG 608 Seminar: British Literature to 1800 (3)
  • ENG 609 Seminar: British Literature after 1800 (3)
  • ENG 610 Seminar: American Literature to 1865 (3)
  • ENG 611 Seminar: American Literature after 1865 (3)
  • ENG 612 Seminar: Gender in Literature (3)
  • ENG 618 Seminar: Multicultural Literature (3)
  • ENG 635 Seminar: World Literature (3)
  • ENG 661 Seminar: Topics in Children's and Young Adult Literature (3)

Electives (10-18 credits)

Choose 10 - 18 credits from any 500- or 600-level English courses, in consultation with advisor.

One of the following

  • ENG 699 Thesis, with oral defense (3-4 credits)
  • ENG 694 Alternate Plan Paper (1-2 credits)
  • ENG 688 Portfolio (1-2 credits)

Additional Requirement

At least 50% of all coursework must be at the 600-level, excluding thesis, APP, or Portfolio credits.

 

Graduate Certificate in Teaching Writing

16 credits

This certificate enables current and prospective teachers (grades 5 - college) to develop expertise in teaching writing. Students will gain theoretical, practical, and experiential knowledge about the teaching of writing that will strengthen their confidence and understanding as writing teachers.

Common Core

  • ENG 555  Advanced Writing Workshop (4)
  • ENG 625  Seminar: Composition Theory (3)
  • ENG 655* Topics in Teaching Writing (3)

*ENG 621 and ENG 622 may be taken, with the permission the instructor, as a substitution for ENG 655. ENG 621 and 622 are only offered face-to-face.

Restricted Electives

Students may choose from the following course list, taking at least 6 and no more than 8 credits.

  • ENG 584  Pedagogical Grammar and Academic English (4)
  • ENG 649  Topics in Creative Writing (1-3)
  • ENG 656  Teacher Research in the Writing Classroom (3)
  • ENG 657  Teaching Writing with Literature (3)

 
Literature Option

This program has been suspended and is no longer accepting new students, as of 2011. The MA Literature and MA English Studies programs have been combined. See MA English Studies program above.


Technical Communication Option

Thesis Plan - 30 credits
Alternate Paper Plan - 34 credits
Contact: Dr. Roland Nord

Students choosing this option will find the degree prepares them to be professional information developers, technical writers, and editors who are skilled at using the written and spoken word, along with visuals, to effectively inform and instruct a wide range of audiences. Graduates typically pursue work in industry, teaching opportunities, or doctoral studies.

Admission Requirements

At least 18 semester hours in one or more of the following areas: literature, linguistics, speech, or mass communications. All applicants must submit a one-page personal statement (to the Graduate Director, Department of English), describing their background and interests in technical communication. The GRE is not required as part of admissions material for the program. Candidates whose native language is not English must have a TOEFL score of 550 or above. Application materials should include an application form, verification of the baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or university, two copies of official undergraduate and graduate transcripts, sent to the College of Graduate Studies and Research.

Required Courses: Technical Communication Core (14 credits)

  •  ENG 575 Editing Technical Publications (4)
  •  ENG 577 Technical Documentation, Policies and Procedures (4)
  •  ENG 673 Research and Theory for Technical Communicators (3)
  •  ENG 679 Rhetorical Theory Applied to Technical Documents (3)

Electives (9 - 16 credits)

  •  ENG 568 Document Design and Usability (4)
  •  ENG 569 Project Management in Technical Communication (4)
  •  ENG 571 Visual Technical Communication (4)
  •  ENG 572 Topics in Technical Communication* (4)
  •  ENG 573 Desktop Publishing (4)
  •  ENG 574 Researching and Writing Technical Reports (4)
  •  ENG 576 Online Documentation (4)
  •  ENG 674 Topics in Technical Communication* (1-3)
  •  ENG 678 Technical and Scientific Prose (3)
  •  ENG 680  Proposals (3) 
      *may be repeated under various topics  

Other requirements 

  •  ENG 698 Internship (3-6) and
  •  ENG 699 Thesis (3-4) or
  •  ENG 694 Alternate Plan Paper (1-2)

Additional Requirements

At least 50% of all coursework must be at 600-level, excluding thesis or APP credits.
Oral defense (with thesis option)

 

Graduate Certificate in Technical Communication

23 credits
Contact: Dr. Roland Nord

The graduate certificate program prepares participants for careers in technical communication, emphasizing current industry practice in the research, writing, editing, and publishing of (print or online ) technical documents. Required coursework emphasizes the development of student skills in audience analysis, problem solving, and collaboration within the workplace as well as the production of text and graphics for print and online publication. Special topics courses focus on industry practice in standards and documentation, document design, web development, usability testing, international communication, or other topics of importance to technical communicators. Although 500-level courses in the graduate certificate focus on skill development and industry practice, they also explore theory and research supporting industry practice.

Admission Requirements

Entrance requirements for the Graduate Certificate in Technical Communication include a BA or BS degree and Technical Communication (ENG 271), Business Communication (ENG 272), or equivalent technical communication experience. The GRE is not required as part of the admissions material for this program. Candidates whose native language is not English must have a TOEFL score of 550 or above.

Required courses in Technical Communication (15 credits)

  • ENG 571 Visual Technical Communication (4)
  • ENG 575 Editing Technical Publications (4)
  • ENG 577 Technical Documentation, Policies and Procedures (4)
  • ENG 674 Topics in Technical Communication* or
  • ENG 680 Topics: Computer-Assisted Writing (3)

    *may be repeated under various topics; additional credits of ENG 674 or ENG 680 may be used as electives.

Elective courses (8 credits)

  • ENG 568 Document Design and Usability (4)
  • ENG 569 Project Management in Technical Communication (4)
  • ENG 572 Topics in Technical Communication* (1-4)
  • ENG 573 Desktop Publishing (4)
  • ENG 574 Researching & Writing Technical Reports (4)
  • ENG 576 Online Documentation (4)

 

Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) Option

Thesis Plan - 30 credits
Alternate Plan Paper or Portfolio - 34 credits
Contact: Dr. Stephen Stoynoff

Students choosing this option will find the degree appropriate preparation for
teaching English as a second/foreign language, program administration, curriculum
consulting, and publishing and materials development. It is designed for both native
and non-native speakers of English. To enter the program, students must have an
undergraduate major or minor in a relevant field (for example, English, linguistics,
or a modern language other than English). Candidates in the TESL track who are
native speakers of English must have a minimum of two years of a foreign language
at the college level. This language requirement for native speakers may be met in-residence,
but courses taken to fulfill the language requirement will not count toward the degree.
Candidates whose native language is not English must have a TOEFL score of 79 or
above. The GRE is not required for this program.

It is also possible to earn certification in teaching English as a
second language in grades K-12. For Masters' candidates with undergraduate
licensure degrees, the MA in TESL includes most of the courses needed for TESL
certification.

Alternate Plan Paper or Portfolio Option (34 credits)

Required TESL Courses (26 credits)

  • ENG 586 Theories of Teaching ESL (4)
  • ENG 587 Methods of Teaching ESL (4)
  • ENG 627 Research Seminar in TESL (3)
  • ENG 629 Second Language Literacy Development (3)
  • ENG 633 Second Language Acquisition (3)
  • ENG 634 Topics in TESL (3)
  • ENG 686 Second Language Testing (3)
  • ENG 689 Studies in English Linguistics (3)

Elective Courses (8 credits)

Choose two of the following.

  • ENG 582 English Structure and Pedagogical Grammar (4)
  • ENG 584 Pedagogical Grammar and Academic English (4)
  • ENG 585 Language and Culture in TESL (4)

The Alternate Plan Paper or Portfolio is completed as part of ENG 627.

Thesis Option (30 credits)

Required TESL Courses (23 credits)

  • ENG 586 Theories of Teaching ESL (4)
  • ENG 587 Methods of Teaching ESL (4)
  • ENG 627 Research Seminar in TESL (3)
  • ENG 629 Second Language Literacy Development (3)
  • ENG 633 Second Language Acquisition (3)
  • ENG 686 Second Language Testing (3)
  • ENG 689 Studies in English Linguistics (3)

Elective courses (4 credits)

Choose one of the following.

  • ENG 582 English Structure and Pedagogical Grammar (4)
  • ENG 584 Pedagogical Grammar and Academic English (4)

Thesis (3 credits)

  • ENG 699 Thesis (3)

Additional requirements for all TESL capstone options

At least 50% of all coursework must be taken at the 600-level, excluding thesis or
APP credits. An oral presentation of the thesis will normally be required as well.

 

Graduate Certificate in Teaching English as a Second Language ( 24 credits)

The graduate certificate in Teaching English as a Second Language prepares
participants for careers in teaching English as a second or foreign language to adult
learners in U.S. and international contexts, including in two- and four-year
institutions, government and non-government organizations, and private
enterprises. Coursework develops students' knowledge of how language operates
with primary emphasis on the English language and the skills required to teach it
effectively to adult second language learners.

Required courses (20 credits)

  • ENG 586 Theories of Teaching ESL (4)
  • ENG 587 Methods of Teaching ESL (4)
  • ENG 633 Second Language Acquisition (3)
  • ENG 634 Topics in TESL (3)
  • ENG 686 Second Language Testing (3)
  • ENG 689 Studies in English Linguistics (3)

Elective courses (4 credits)

Choose one of the following.

  • ENG 582 English Structure (4)
  • ENG 584 Pedagogical Grammar and Academic English (4)

Additional Requirements

At least 50% of all coursework must be completed at the 600-level.

 

Creative Writing MFA

Thesis Plan - 48 credits
Contact: Richard Robbins, MFA

The MFA program in Creative Writing meets the needs of students who want to strike a balance between the development of individual creative talent and the close study of literature and language. Candidates in the program will find it appropriate training for careers in freelance writing, college-level teaching, editing and publishing, arts administration, and several other areas.

Admission

The application deadline for graduate assistantship consideration is February 1st. Applicants must submit a writing portfolio (10 pages of poetry or 20 pages of prose) and a one to two page personal statement directly to the Department of English, Creative Writing Program. To enter the program without deficiency, candidates must have the equivalent of at least a minor in English (18 semester credits in language, literature, linguistics). Students who enter with a small number of deficiencies may be allowed to make them up within their graduate program. Candidates whose native language is not English must have a TOEFL score of 550 or above. The GRE is not required for this program.

Research (3 credits)

  • ENG 672 Research and Publication in Creative Writing (3)

Writing Seminars/Workshops - minimum 12 credits from the following.

 Courses are repeatable with new content.

  • ENG 542 Advanced Creative Nonfiction Workshop (4)
  • ENG 543 Advanced Fiction Workshop (4)
  • ENG 544 Advanced Poetry Workshop (4)
  • ENG 594 English Workshop (4)
  • ENG 642 Creative Nonfiction Workshop (3)
  • ENG 643 Fiction Workshop (3)
  • ENG 644 Poetry Workshop (3)
  • ENG 649 Topics in Creative Writing (1-3)

Form and Technique (6 credits)

  • ENG 640 Form & Technique in Prose (3)
  • ENG 641 Form & Technique in Poetry (3)

Contemporary Genres (6 credits)

  • ENG 646 Contemporary Prose (3)
  • ENG 647 Contemporary Poetry (3)

Career-related - minimum 6 credits from the following.

(Other courses acceptable with consent of advisor)

  • ENG 516 Film Criticism (4)
  • ENG 541 Literary Criticism (4)
  • ENG 574 Research and Writing Technical Reports (4)
  • ENG 575 Editing Technical Publications (4)
  • ENG 577 Technical Documentation, Policies, and Procedures (4)
  • ENG 621 Introductory Workshop for Teaching Assistants (1-2)
  • ENG 622 Workshop for Teaching Assistants (1)
  • ENG 625 Seminar: Composition Theory (3)
  • ENG 649 Topics in Creative Writing: Teaching Creative Writing (3)
  • ENG 680 Topics in Computer-Assisted Writing (3)
  • ENG 687 Theory and Practice of Translation (3)
  • ENG 698 Internship (1-8)

Electives (0 - 11 credits)

In consultation with an advisor, select 0-11 credits of courses in categories (such as literature) not listed above.
 

Thesis (4)

  • ENG 699 Thesis (4)

 Additional Requirements

All courses must be in English with the exception of those specifically approved by the Graduate Committee in English; 75% of all coursework must be taken at the 600-level. Students must take a two-part written examination based on a reading list. Students also are required to present a reading/oral defense as part of their thesis project, a book-length collection of writing in the student's chosen genre.

 

Teaching Writing Certificate


This certificate enables current and prospective teachers (Grade 5-College) to develop expertise in teaching writing. Students will gain theoretical, practical, and experiential knowledge about the teaching of writing that will strengthen their confidence and understanding as writing teachers.

Common Core
Please note that ENG 621 and ENG 622 may be taken, with the permission of the instructor, as a substitution for ENG 655. ENG 621 and 622 are only offered face-to-face.
ENG 555 Advanced Writing Workshop 4  
ENG 625 Seminar: Composition Theory 3  
ENG 655 Topics in Teaching Writing 3  

Restricted Electives
Students may choose from the following course list, taking at least 6 and no more than 8 credits.
ENG 584 Pedagogical Grammar and Academic English 4  
ENG 649 Topics in Creative Writing 1-3  
ENG 656 Teacher Research in the Writing Classroom 3  
ENG 657 Teaching Writing with Literature 3

 

Course Descriptions

ENG 503 (2-4) Selected Authors

Content changes. May be repeated.

ENG 516 (4) Film Theory & Criticism

Trends in film theory and criticism. Practice in critical analysis.

ENG 525 (2-4) Topics in Children's Literature

Topics in genres such as fantasy and historical fiction and thematic topics such as survival or journeys. May be repeated with different subject matter.

ENG 526 (2-4) Selected Periods

Selected periods of literary study.

ENG 532 (2-4) Selected Studies: Novel

Content changes. May be repeated.

ENG 533 (4) Selected Studies in World Literature

Topics on themes, issues, and developments in genres of the literatures of the world. Content changes. May be repeated.

ENG 535 (2-4) The World Novel

A study of selected novels from a variety of time periods and cultures, including Eastern and Western Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

ENG 536 (2-4) Native American Literature

This course surveys the earliest Native American literary works, from oral tradition and songs to contemporary works and authors, with a particular emphasis on tribal and cultural contexts that identify these works as Native American.

ENG 538 (2-4) African American Literature

This course surveys the earliest African American literary works, including slave narratives, poetry, folklore, and oration, through the 20th century movements such as the Jazz Age, Harlem Renaissance, and the Black Arts movements of the 1960s, to contemporary works and authors.

ENG 542 (4) Advanced Creative Nonfiction Workshop

Advanced workshop in writing personal essays and literary journalism.
Prerequisite: writing course or consent of instructor

ENG 543 (4) Advanced Fiction Workshop

An advanced course in writing short stories and novels.
Prerequisite: writing course or consent of instructor

ENG 544 (4) Advanced Poetry Workshop

An advanced course in writing poems.
Prerequisite: writing course or consent of instructor

ENG 545 (4) Advanced Critical Writing Workshop

An advanced course in writing critical essays.
Prerequisite: writing course or consent of instructor

ENG 546 (4) Screenwriting

Introduction to writing for the screen
Prerequisite: writing course or consent of instructor

ENG 549 (2-4) Topics in Creative Writing Form and Technique

Topics in Creative Writing Form and Technique will be a variable-title course that explores special topics relating to the technical mastery of one or more creative genres, or the technical achievement of one or more practitioners. May be repeated with different topics.

ENG 553 (4) Topics in Rhetoric and Composition

Topics in Rhetoric and Composition will be a variable title course that explores special topics relating to the theory, history, and practice of one or more areas within rhetoric and composition.

ENG 554 (4) Persuasive Writing on Public Issues

Advanced writing course emphasizing major contemporary public issues. Practice in and study of: the logic by which writers construct arguments; the various means that writers use to persuade an audience; the conventions of evidence, claims, and argument in persuasive discourses.

ENG 555 (4) Advanced Writing Workshop

Advanced interdisciplinary writing emphasizes critical reading and thinking, argumentative writing, library research, and documentation of sources in an academic setting. Practice and study of selected rhetorics of inquiry employed in academic disciplines preparing students for different systems of writing.

ENG 563 (4) Adolescent Literature

A survey of literature for students in grades 5 - 12, fiction and nonfiction, and methods of teaching this literature.

ENG 564 (3) Teaching Literature in Middle School

Survey of books suitable for the Middle School classroom, covering a variety of topics and genres.

ENG 565 (1-4) World Literature for Children and Young Adults

Selected works of literature for students in grades 5-12 from a variety of countries and cultures.

ENG 567 (1-4) International Technical Communication

Students learn how to research and write technical information for multiple cultures, both locally and internationally

ENG 568 (4) Document Design and Usability

Covers approaches to the design, development, and testing of (print and online) technical documents, focusing on feedback-driven design and usability testing.

ENG 569 (4) Project Management in Technical Communication

This course is designed to introduce students to technical project management. This introduction is achieved through participation in a simulated project management experience. Assignments include standard documentation associated with project management and reflective writing.

ENG 571 (4) Visual Technical Communication

Analysis and training focused on concepts and practices of visual design as they relate to technical and professional communication.

ENG 572 (1-4) Topics in Technical Communication

Topics in theory and practice of technical communication. Hands-on course which implements the theories discussed. May be repeated with different subject matter.

ENG 573 (4) Desktop Publishing

Overview of publishing and typography, conventions of desktop publishing, and hardware and software application tools for desktop publishing. Students need not have prior experience with DTP, but some word processing and microcomputer experience will be helpful. Course will meet in both PC and Macintosh labs.

ENG 574 (4) Research and Writing Technical Reports

Practice in writing various types of reports for a variety of purposes and audiences. Includes study of primary and secondary research methods.
Prerequisite: ENG 271 or equivalent

ENG 575 (4) Editing Technical Publications

Editing the content, organization, format, style, and mechanics of documents; managing the production cycle of documents, and discovering and learning microcomputer and software applications for technical editing tasks.

ENG 576 (4) Online Documentation

Introduction to the conventions and strategies for publishing on-line documentation and for managing on-line documentation projects. Topics include analyzing users and tasks, designing and writing documents to be published on-line, testing on-line documents, and managing on-line documentation projects.

ENG 577 (4) Technical Documentation, Policies, & Procedures

Creating both on-line and hard copy documentation for products, with emphasis on computer software and hardware documentation. Attention also to policies and procedures as written for a range of uses (e.g., employee handbooks and manufacturing processes) and to usability testing.

ENG 581 (3) History of English Language

The development of English from its origins as a dialect of Proto-Indo-European to its current form, with consideration of its social history as well as its formal development.

ENG 582 (4) English Structure and Pedagogical Grammar

The English sound system and English structures studied for the purpose of discovering how they can be taught to students of English as a second or foreign language.

ENG 584 (4) Pedagogical Grammar andAcademic English

Investigation of English grammatical structures and the features of Academic English for the purposes of understanding their use and of teaching them to speakers of English as a second or foreign language.

ENG 585 (4) Language and Culture in TESL

A consideration of the cultural issues encountered by teachers of English as a second or foreign language in the U.S. and abroad.

ENG 587 (4 ) Methods of Teaching ESL

Examines the integration of skills, including listening, speaking, reading, writing, and vocabulary use in a variety of contexts, e.g. K-12, adult, higher education, ESL, EFL.

ENG 589 () Policies and Programs in ESL

This course describes state and federal legislation affecting ESL; identification, assessment, placement, and tracking of English Language Learners in the K-12 context; current models of ESL program delivery; and Minnesota State Standards and standardized testing.

ENG 590 (1-4) Topics in TESL

Topics in learning and teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language. May be repeated for credit.

ENG 592 (2-4) Selected Topics

Topics in literary study. May be repeated with change of topic.

ENG 593 (1-4) Topics in Film Studies

Topic-oriented course in film studies. May be repeated with change of topic.

ENG 594 (1-6) English Workshop

Specialized workshops in topics such as computer-assisted writing, teaching the writing of poetry in the secondary school, or discipline-specific writing.

ENG 595 (1-4) Special Studies

Specialized, in-depth study of topics such as Holocaust literature, environmental literature, or regional literature. May be repeated with different subject matter.

ENG 603 (3) Sem: Selected Authors

Studies in selected authors in British, American, Multicultural, or World Literature. May be repeated with different subject matter.

ENG 605 (3) Sem: Shakespeare

Study of works of Shakespeare, including comedies, histories, tragedies, tragicomedies, and some shorter poetic works, including sonnets.

ENG 606 (3) British Literary History and Criticism

The course focuses on the major writers, genres and periods in British literature with an emphasis on historical and critical trends in order to provide an analytical framework that will support subsequent work. Must be taken during the student's first year in the program.

ENG 607 (3) American Literary History and Criticism

This course is designed to give first-year graduate students a foundation in American literary history and criticism. The course focuses on the major writers, genres and periods in American literature with an emphasis on historical and critical trends in order to provide an analytical framework that will support subsequent work. Must be taken during the student's first year in the program.

ENG 608 (3) Sem: British Literature to 1800

Studies in topics/periods in British Literature to 1800. Emphasizes close readings of primary works, analysis of pertinent secondary works, detailed class discussion, and analytical writing. May be repeated with different subject matter.

ENG 609 (3) Sem: British Literature after 1800

Studies in topics/periods in British Literature after 1800. Emphasizes close readings of primary works, analyzing pertinent secondary works, detailed class discussion, and analytical writing. May be repeated with different subject matter.

ENG 610 (3) Sem: American Literature to 1865

Analysis of topics/periods in American Literature before 1865. Emphasizes close reading of primary works, analysis of pertinent secondary works, detailed class discussion, and analytical writing. May be repeated with different subject matter.

ENG 611 (3) Sem: American Literature after 1865

Analysis of topics/periods in modern and contemporary American Literature, i.e. fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama. Emphasizes close reading of primary works, analysis of pertinent secondary works, detailed class discussion, and analytical writing. May be repeated with different subject matter.

ENG 612 (3) Sem: Gender in Literature

Study of selected works by women writers up through the twentieth century with attention to their works within cultural contexts. May be repeated with different subject matter.

ENG 618 (3) Seminar: Multicultural American Literature

Studies in selected authors, topics, or periods of American multicultural literatures, particularly those of Native American, African American, Chicano/Latino American, and Asian American groups. Emphasizes close readings of primary works, analyzing secondary sources, and analytical writing. May be repeated with different subject matter.

ENG 621 (0-2) Introductory Workshop for Teaching Assistants

Introductory workshop in composition pedagogy for first-year teaching assistants.

ENG 622 (0-2) Workshop for Teaching Assistants

Continued workshop in composition pedagogy for first-year teaching assistants.

ENG 623 (3) Language & Teaching of English

Study of language issues for teachers of English. Intended for those teaching in "mainstream" classrooms populated by a majority of native speakers of English as well as those teaching English as a second or foreign language.

ENG 625 (3) Seminar: Composition Theory

Introduction to the major theories of the nature of composition and their pedagogical application.

ENG 626 (3) Bibliography & Research in TESL

Introduction to the types and principles of research in teaching English as a second or foreign language.

ENG 627 (3) Research Seminar in TESL

Provides students with an opportunity to be immersed in the research process and to select, organize, analyze, synthesize and present research. Supports students' development of theses and alternate plan papers.

ENG 629 (3) Second Language Literacy Development

Study of literacy from a socioliterate perspective. Intended to promote acquisition of multiple literacies.

ENG 630 (2-3) Studies in Language & Literature

Topics in a broad range of English studies. May be repeated with different subject matter.

ENG 631 (3) Language Planning/Policy

Study of governmental efforts to influence or regulate language use, viewed from a world-wide perspective.

ENG 632 (3) Bilingualsm/2nd Language Contact

Study of the social environments where more than one language is spoken and the effects upon individuals of living in such environments.

ENG 633 (3) Second Language Acquisition

Study of how languages other than one's mother tongue are learned.

ENG 634 (3) Topics in TESL

Topics in the area of teaching English as a second language. May be repeated with a different subject matter.

ENG 635 (3) Sem: World Literature

Studies in selected national literature or in topics/periods of world literature. May be repeated with different subject matter.

ENG 640 (3) Form and Technique in Prose

Study of the technical underpinnings of fiction and non-fiction.

ENG 641 (3) Form and Technique in Poetry

Study of the technical underpinnings of poetry.

ENG 642 (3) Creative Nonfiction Workshop

Workshop in writing personal essays and literary journalism.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor

ENG 643 (3) Fiction Workshop

Workshop in fiction writing.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor

ENG 644 (3) Poetry Workshop

Workshop in poetry writing.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor

ENG 645 (3) Multi-genre Creative Writing Workshop

This course is a creative writing workshop for English or non-English graduate students who are not currently admitted to the MFA program.

ENG 646 (3) Contemporary Prose

Study and analysis of selected works in fiction and nonfiction since 1945.

ENG 647 (3) Contemporary Poetry

Study and analysis of poetry since 1945.

ENG 649 (1-3) Topics in Creative Writing

Topics relating to creative writing. May be repeated with different subject matter.

ENG 651 (3) Bibliography & Research

Cornerstone course of MA English Literature: Literature and MA English: English Studies options, covering research and critical writing strategies for master's level and professional work in the field. Enables students to develop a concrete focus for the thesis (Literature and English Studies) or alternate plan paper proposal (English Studies).

ENG 655 (3) Topics in Teaching Writing

This course will examine current instructional practices used to teach writing in academic settings. The grade-level focus of the course ("middle/high school" or "college") will change each time it is offered.

Variable

ENG 656 (3) Teacher Research in the Writing Classroom

This course will introduce methods of inquiry-based research for investigating writing practices and pedagogy; this research could be conducted in classrooms for the purpose of improving teaching practices, students’ learning, and/or institutional curricular design and practices. 
 

ENG 657 (3) Teaching Writing with Literature

This course will explore the theoretical and practical implications of integrating literature into the composition classroom.

Variable

ENG 661 (2-3) Topics in Children's & Young Adult Literature

Topics of interest to the teacher or professional working in the field of children's and young adult literature. May be repeated with different subject matter.

ENG 662 (2-3) Topics in English Education

Topics such as writing assessment, teaching poetry, and teaching writing in the secondary schools. May be repeated with different subject matter.

ENG 670 (1-3) Independent Writing

Individualized study in writing. (Creative writing majors may take up to 3 credits total.)

ENG 671 (3) Seminar: Literary Theory and Criticism

Advanced study of theories of literature and its production and use.

ENG 672 (3) Research & Publication in Creative Writing

Exploration of the business of creative writing and the tools for writing and research in the field.

ENG 673 (3) Research & Theory Technical Communications

Seminar for students engaged in conducting a major research project in the technical communication field. Emphasizes theoretical approaches to research, development and implementation of the individual research project, and presentation and publication opportunities in professional writing.

ENG 674 (1-3) Topics in Technical Communication

Topics relating to rhetorical theory in the workplace, including examination of how workplace cultures shape writing assumptions and approaches. May be repeated with different subject matter.

ENG 676 () Instructional Design for Technical Communicators

Examination of instructional design principles and models, including research in theory and practice of instructional design for technical communicators in academic and industry settings.

ENG 677 (1-4) Individual Study

Focused study on a topic not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ENG 678 (3) Technical & Scientific Prose

Analysis of fiction and literary nonfiction that treats technical and scientific themes.

ENG 679 (3) Rhetorical Theory Applied to Technical Documents

Rhetorical theory applied to technical documents, including an examination of how workplace cultures shape writing assumptions and approaches.

ENG 680 (3) Proposals

Theory and practice in the development and production of proposals, focusing on the researching, writing, and management of proposals by technical communicators.

ENG 682 (3) English Grammar and Discourse

Advanced study of English syntax.

ENG 684 (3) Sociolinguistics

Study of the interaction of language use and social structures.

ENG 685 (3) Materials for TESL

Location and assessment of commercial materials and creation and publication of original materials to support instruction in English as a second or foreign language.

ENG 686 (3) Second Language Testing

Introduction to language tests and the assessment of various language abilities.

ENG 687 (3) Theory & Practice Translation

Literary and non-literary translation.

ENG 688 (1-4) Portfolio

This course will involve the preparation of a portfolio in consultation with the instructor.

ENG 689 (3) Studies English Linguistics

Studies in theoretical and applied linguistics.

ENG 691 (1-3) Colloquium

Advanced studies in language, literature, film, or theory. Permission required.

ENG 694 (1-2) Alternate Plan Paper

Independent capstone experience, focusing on secondary research sources; paper may have other guidelines specific to the program option.

ENG 698 (1-6) Internship

On-site field experience, the nature of which is determined by the specific needs of the student's program option.

ENG 699 (1-4) Thesis

Independent capstone experience, guidelines of which are determined by the requirements of a particular program option.